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A drone show in advance of General Electric splitting into three companies: GE Aerospace, GE Vernova, and GE Healthcare Gary Hershorn/Corbis News/Getty Images hide caption

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Indicators of the Week: Broadband, bonds, and break-ups

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General Electric has been making lightbulbs for more than a century but is now selling its lighting business. Above, a lightbulb is displayed at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C., in 2015. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

GE No Longer Bringing Good Things To 'Light'

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Jack Welch served as General Electric's chief executive from 1981 to 2001. During his reign, the company's market value skyrocketed to $410 billion from $12 billion. Mike Coppola/Getty Images for LinkedIn hide caption

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Mike Coppola/Getty Images for LinkedIn

Jack Welch, Legendary CEO Of General Electric, Dead At 84

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John Flannery is being replaced as head of General Electric. GE's status fell sharply over the past decade. The company has resorted to selling off divisions and laying off employees, a process that accelerated under Flannery. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Specialist John McNierney works at the post that handles General Electric on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in January. The struggling company is being dropped from the Dow Jones industrial average. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

President Barack Obama looks at a turbine during a tour in 2011 of the General Electric plant in Schenectady, N.Y., with then GE Chairman and CEO Jeffrey Immelt (left) and plant manager Kevin Sharkey. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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GE Struggles To Show It Still Has Magic Touch

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