FAA FAA

National Transportation Safety Board investigators examine damage to Southwest Airlines Flight 1380, which left one passenger dead and other injured on April 17. A passenger filed a lawsuit against the airline on Thursday. Handout/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Handout/Getty Images

The HQ-40 drone, made by Tuscon, Ariz.-based Latitude Engineering, can carry samples for medical testing in a refrigerated container. Johns Hopkins School of Medicine hide caption

toggle caption
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

President Trump is reportedly considering his personal pilot, John Dunkin (left), to be head of the Federal Aviation Administration. Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty Images

Trump Reportedly Considering His Personal Pilot To Captain FAA

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/588957046/588985268" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

This holiday season, shoppers will buy nearly 1.6 million drones, up 31 percent from last year, according to the Consumer Technology Association. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ethan Miller/Getty Images

The FAA approved a Pulse Vapor drone like this one — but outfitted with LTE radios and antennas — to provide temporary voice, data, and internet service in Puerto Rico. Mary Esch/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mary Esch/AP

An NTSB investigation on a deadly hot air balloon crash in July 2016 found that the pilot had a "pattern of poor decision-making" and was impaired by drugs and medical conditions. Here, authorities block a road near the crash site in Maxwell, Texas. Aaron M. Sprecher/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Aaron M. Sprecher/AFP/Getty Images

Authorities investigate the site of a hot air balloon accident in Maxwell, Texas, on Saturday. All 16 people aboard the hot air balloon died after it hit tall, high-voltage power lines. Aaron M. Sprecher/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Aaron M. Sprecher/AFP/Getty Images

Chinese brand DJI Technology Co. has become the leading supplier in the commercial drone market. The Phantom 2 Vision+ drone pictured functions by remote control. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Kin Cheung/AP

What You Should Know Before You Test The Holiday's 'Flyest' Gift

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/459456519/459464350" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Alisha Lalani, 10, of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., looks at her phone as her mother and brother check in for their flight to Miami at Washington's Reagan National Airport. Their flight was one of thousands delayed as a result of a technical glitch with an FAA automated system. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jacquelyn Martin/AP

September 13, 2009 photo of Andreas Lubitz, who is believed to have deliberately crashed Germanwings Flight 9525 into a mountain in southern France on March 24, 2015, killing all 150 people on board. Getty Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images/Getty Images

A Southwest Airlines pilot and co-pilot preparing for a flight from Dallas last year. In the wake of the Germanwings crash this week, many European airlines are rushing to adopt a two-person cockpit rule similar to the one already in place in the U.S. LM Otero/AP hide caption

toggle caption
LM Otero/AP

Drones are displayed at an event with the Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) Coalition, last month. The FAA's proposed new rules for their commercial use require certified pilots to fly them and limit their speed, altitude and area of operation. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Travelers lined up Friday to reschedule flights at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport after the region's air traffic control was sabotaged. More flights are resuming Saturday, but hundreds were also canceled. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Olson/Getty Images

Where Can Drones Fly? Legal Limits Are Up In the Air

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/339181964/339292762" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript