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Boeing said on Sunday that it was aware of problems with a key safety indicator in 2017, but it didn't inform airlines or the FAA until after the Lion Air crash a year later. Here, 737 Max jets built for American Airlines (left) and Air Canada are parked at the airport adjacent to a Boeing production facility in Renton, Wash., in April. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Analysts say Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg and the company were slow to take responsibility in the crashes of two 737 Max planes within months of each other. Anna Moneymaker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Boeing Slow To 'Own' Recent Air Disasters, Analysts Say

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Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 Max aircraft are parked at a Southern California airport after the aircraft was grounded by the FAA. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

Not Just Airplanes: Why The Government Often Lets Industry Regulate Itself

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At a Senate hearing March 27, Daniel Elwell, acting director of the Federal Aviation Administration, said airline pilots had enough training to handle Boeing's flight control software. But some pilots disagree. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Pilots Split Over FAA Chief's Claims On Boeing 737 Max Training

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Federal Aviation Administration Acting Administrator Daniel Elwell (left), National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Robert Sumwalt, and Department of Transportation Inspector General Calvin Scovel, appear before a Senate Transportation subcommittee on commercial airline safety on Wednesday to discuss two recent Boeing 737 Max crashes. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

FAA Head Defends Agency Actions Following Recent Air Disasters

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Responders at the scene of an Ethiopian Airlines flight crash. Countries around the world have grounded their Boeing 737 Max jets and there is growing political pressure on the Federal Aviation Administration to do the same. Mulugeta Ayene/AP hide caption

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Mulugeta Ayene/AP

Flights at LaGuardia Airport in New York were delayed Friday morning as the FAA said it was experiencing an uptick in workers calling in sick. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

Despite a new congressional mandate to set minimum seat widths and legroom standards, the FAA is unlikely to expand airline seat size anytime soon. Johan Marengrd/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Johan Marengrd/EyeEm/Getty Images

Cramped Legroom On Flights Unlikely To Change, Despite Congressional Mandate

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The U.S. Senate passed a bill Wednesday to reauthorize the Federal Aviation Administration, including provisions that require the FAA to set a minimum size for commercial airplane seats. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

National Transportation Safety Board investigators examine damage to Southwest Airlines Flight 1380, which left one passenger dead and other injured on April 17. A passenger filed a lawsuit against the airline on Thursday. Handout/Getty Images hide caption

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Handout/Getty Images

The HQ-40 drone, made by Tuscon, Ariz.-based Latitude Engineering, can carry samples for medical testing in a refrigerated container. Johns Hopkins School of Medicine hide caption

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Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

President Trump is reportedly considering his personal pilot, John Dunkin (left), to be head of the Federal Aviation Administration. Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty Images

Trump Reportedly Considering His Personal Pilot To Captain FAA

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This holiday season, shoppers will buy nearly 1.6 million drones, up 31 percent from last year, according to the Consumer Technology Association. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

The FAA approved a Pulse Vapor drone like this one — but outfitted with LTE radios and antennas — to provide temporary voice, data, and internet service in Puerto Rico. Mary Esch/AP hide caption

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Mary Esch/AP

An NTSB investigation on a deadly hot air balloon crash in July 2016 found that the pilot had a "pattern of poor decision-making" and was impaired by drugs and medical conditions. Here, authorities block a road near the crash site in Maxwell, Texas. Aaron M. Sprecher/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron M. Sprecher/AFP/Getty Images

Authorities investigate the site of a hot air balloon accident in Maxwell, Texas, on Saturday. All 16 people aboard the hot air balloon died after it hit tall, high-voltage power lines. Aaron M. Sprecher/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron M. Sprecher/AFP/Getty Images