Arctic Arctic
Varham Muradyan for NPR

Are There Zombie Viruses In The Thawing Permafrost?

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The Permafrost Tunnel Research Facility, dug in the mid-1960s, allows scientists a three-dimensional look at frozen ground. Kate Ramsayer/NASA hide caption

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Kate Ramsayer/NASA

Is There A Ticking Time Bomb Under The Arctic?

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Archaeologists are excavating an ancient cabin at the Rising Whale site. Cape Espenberg Birnirk Project hide caption

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Cape Espenberg Birnirk Project

How To Survive Climate Change? Clues Are Buried In The Arctic

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Melt ponds dot a stretch of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean, north of Greenland. This year was the Arctic's second-warmest in at least 1,500 years, after 2016. Nathan Kurtz/NASA hide caption

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Nathan Kurtz/NASA

Arctic's Temperature Continues To Run Hot, Latest 'Report Card' Shows

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Researchers found that when narwhals like these were released from a net, the animals' heart rates dropped even as they were swimming rapidly. Flip Nicklin/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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Flip Nicklin/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images

Stressed-Out Narwhals Don't Know Whether To Freeze Or Flee, Scientists Find

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The Pacific walrus is facing "extinction from climate change" after the White House refused to list the species as endangered, one conservation group says. S.A. Sonsthagen/AP hide caption

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S.A. Sonsthagen/AP

A U.S. Coast Guard crew retrieves a canister dropped by parachute in the Arctic in 2011. Over the past four decades, researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and several other universities have studied shifts in atmospheric circulation above the Arctic. NASA/Kathryn Hansen hide caption

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NASA/Kathryn Hansen

Temperatures are up and ice cover is down in the Arctic this year. Scientists say climate change is altering the region faster than other parts of the planet. Greenland Travel via Flickr hide caption

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Greenland Travel via Flickr

Arctic Is Warming At 'Astonishing' Rates, Researchers Say

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The Crystal Serenity, pictured here in Seward, Alaska, is the largest cruise ship to traverse the Northwest Passage, traveling from Alaska to New York City. Rachel Waldholz/Alaska Public Radio hide caption

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Rachel Waldholz/Alaska Public Radio

In Warmer Climate, A Luxury Cruise Sets Sail Through Northwest Passage

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Sea ice melts off the beach of Barrow, Alaska, where Operation IceBridge is based for its summer 2016 campaign. Kate Ramsayer/NASA hide caption

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Kate Ramsayer/NASA

As July's Record Heat Builds Through August, Arctic Ice Keeps Melting

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A typical apartment building in Roslyakovo. Russian President Vladimir Putin signed papers ordering the town to open its doors to the world on Jan. 1, 2015. Mary Louise Kelly/NPR hide caption

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Mary Louise Kelly/NPR

A Once-Closed Russian Military Town In The Arctic Opens To The World

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The new Russian nuclear-powered icebreaker Arktika launches in St. Petersburg, Russia, on Thursday. Russia has been modernizing its icebreaker fleet as part of its efforts to strengthen its Arctic presence. Evgeny Uvarov/AP hide caption

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Evgeny Uvarov/AP