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Truck driver James Matthew Bradley Jr. was sentenced to life in prison without parole on Friday. Officers found 39 immigrants inside a vehicle that he was driving in July 2017. Ten of the passengers died. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

A fire crew gave Ryland Ward a lift home after he was released from the hospital. The 6-year-old survived wounds suffered in the attack on a church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, in November. University Health System, San Antonio hide caption

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University Health System, San Antonio

Chorizo and egg, papas rancheras and country guisado tacos on handmade flour tortillas from Mendez Cafe in San Antonio. Mike Sutter/San Antonio Express-News hide caption

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Mike Sutter/San Antonio Express-News

This Food Critic's Quest To Eat A Taco A Day For A Year Is Almost A Wrap

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James Mathew Bradley Jr., 60, (center) is escorted out of the federal court house following a hearing Monday in San Antonio. Bradley was arrested in connection with the deaths of 10 people packed into a broiling tractor-trailer. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

San Antonio police officers are seen in a parking lot where at least nine people were found dead in a tractor-trailer that contained at least 30 others outside a Walmart store. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

San Antonio Express-News food critic Mike Sutter has already eaten about 700 tacos during his yearlong taco-a-day quest. San Antonio Express-News hide caption

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San Antonio Express-News

Food Critic Now Halfway Through Taco-A-Day Quest. Will He Fold?

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Physician assistant James Williams (right) describes the treatment of burn patients as "a very tactile type of medicine." Wendy Rigby/TPR hide caption

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Wendy Rigby/TPR

Civilians With Severe Burns Treated At Texas Military Hospital

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An immigration detainee stands near a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) grievance box last month in the high security unit at the Theo Lacy Facility, a county jail in Orange, Calif., that also houses immigration detainees arrested by ICE. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

Spotlight On Migrant Crimes Drums Up Support For Trump's Immigration Dragnet

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In San Antonio, a church-based group is helping to raise the minimum wage for city employees. Koocheekoo/Flickr hide caption

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Koocheekoo/Flickr

In Conservative Town, Faith-Based Group Tackles Minimum Wage Hike

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Leon Evans, director of the community mental health system for Bexar County and San Antonio, broke through barriers that had hindered care. Jenny Gold/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Jenny Gold/Kaiser Health News