Jordan Jordan

A tribal leader from the Rukban camp tries to get help for children from Raqaa who were separated from their parents, who were allowed into Jordan two years ago after their father became ill. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

Along Syria-Jordan Border, Refugees Struggle At A Camp Aid Workers Can't Visit

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Yahya Abu Romman stands outside his family's home in downtown Amman. The 22-year-old was deported from the U.S. after landing in Chicago at the end of January with a valid visa. He says border officers questioned why he holds a Jordanian passport when he was born in Syria. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Deported With A Valid U.S. Visa, Jordanian Says Message Is 'You're Not Welcome'

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Supporters attend a gathering for Jordan's National Alliance for Reform, a political bloc including the Muslim Brotherhood, in Amman's Sweileh District last September. "In a lot of countries, we are in partnership with governments and parliament," says a brotherhood spokesman in Amman. Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty Images

Muslim Brotherhood, Mainstream In Many Countries, May Be Listed As Terrorist Group

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A caretaker examines a bear named Balou to be sure he's fully sedated before he's moved from a center near Amman, Jordan, to the al-Ma'wa wildlife reserve in northern Jordan on Oct. 2. The bear and other animals were released into the reserve run by the Princess Alia Foundation. The animals were rescued from abusive conditions. Thomas Hartwell/AP hide caption

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Thomas Hartwell/AP

Abused Animals Find Refuge In A New Sanctuary In Jordan

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Jordanian anti-terrorism units pass in front of the intelligence services office at the Baqaa refugee camp north of Amman following Monday's terrorist attack. Jordan Pix/Getty Images hide caption

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Safi al-Kasasbeh and his wife Isaaf are the parents of Moath al-Kasasbeh, the Jordanian air force pilot who was captured by the Islamic State in Syria and later killed by the group. Alice Fordham / NPR hide caption

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Alice Fordham / NPR

In Jordan, A Family And A Country Feel The Loss Of A Pilot

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Jordan's King Abdullah II pays a hospital visit to people injured in Monday's shooting at a police training center. Yousef Allan/Jordanian royal palace via EPA/Landov hide caption

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Yousef Allan/Jordanian royal palace via EPA/Landov

Jordan's election laws make it impossible for any one political party to build a strong bloc in Parliament. Observers say that's one reason for the country's weakness — and for the growing appeal of the messages used by militants of the self-proclaimed Islamic State. Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty Images

For One Parliamentarian, A Stronger Jordan Is Key To Fighting ISIS

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Lina Ejeilat helped found the Jordanian online magazine 7iber (pronounced 'Hebber'). While the government encourages free expression in principle, many strict regulations remain, as noted by the satirical chart next to her. Art Silverman/NPR hide caption

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Art Silverman/NPR

Jordan's Fuzzy Definition Of Free Speech

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Jordanians marched in the streets of the capital Amman on Feb. 6 to show solidarity with the family of a pilot killed by the Islamic State in Syria. Jordanians also expressed support for the king's decision to take part in the U.S.-led coalition against ISIS. Muhammad Hamed/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Muhammad Hamed/Reuters/Landov

Jordan's King Balances Threats Abroad And Critics At Home

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Jordanian soldiers stand guard at the Iraq-Jordan border last year. Jordan also shares a border with Syria and has had to deal with a flood of refugees from both its neighbors over the past decade. Jamal Nasrallah/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Jamal Nasrallah/EPA/Landov

Jordan's Army Preps For A Bigger Role Against ISIS

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Demonstrators chant anti-Islamic State group slogans and carry posters with pictures of Jordanian King Abdullah II, late King Hussein and slain Jordanian pilot, Lt. Muath al-Kaseasbeh, during a rally in Amman, Jordan. Nasser Nasser/AP hide caption

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Nasser Nasser/AP

Mourners pray during a ceremony for Jordanian pilot Muath al-Kaseasbeh, who was killed by the Islamic State after he was captured in December. At Wednesday's service, which took place in the city of Karak, mourners called for the destruction of ISIS. Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty hide caption

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Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty

As Jets Roar Overhead, Jordan Remembers Its Fallen Pilot

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Saif al-Kaseasbeh (dressed in black), father of Jordanian pilot Muath al-Kaseasbeh, sits with senior officers of Jordan's military Wednesday at the headquarters of his family's clan in the city of Karak. Kaseasbeh is calling for revenge against ISIS for killing his son. Muhammad Hamed/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Muhammad Hamed/Reuters/Landov

Supporters of Jordanian pilot Lt. Muath al-Kaseasbeh hold posters of him that read, "We are all Muath," during a protest in Amman, Jordan, on Tuesday. Raad Adayleh/AP hide caption

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Raad Adayleh/AP