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Dinaz Campbell, 10, holds Sherry, her newly adopted dog, at an adoption clinic in Rockville, Md. Marisa Penaloza/NPR hide caption

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Marisa Penaloza/NPR

For Many Adopted Dogs, The Journey Home Takes A Thousand Miles

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Researchers discovered ancient animal mummies piled up in heaps inside a catacomb. Many of the mummies were in poor condition. Courtesy of Paul Nicholson hide caption

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Courtesy of Paul Nicholson

Millions Of Mummified Dogs Found In Ancient Egyptian Catacombs

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Allen Burnsworth, owner of Sit Means Sit Dog Training in Los Angeles, demonstrates how to fight off a dog attack with Flash, a trained 2-year-old Belgian Malinois. Allie Ferguson/NPR hide caption

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Allie Ferguson/NPR

Helping Postal Workers Fend Off An Age-Old Problem: Dog Bites

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Actor Johnny Depp brought his dogs to Australia without first placing them under a mandated 10-day quarantine. Toshifumi Kitamura/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Toshifumi Kitamura/AFP/Getty Images

State Sens. Warren Limmer (left) and Bill Ingebrigtsen talk in the Senate chamber. Limmer said he has been scolded for looking at his colleagues during debate before, and had "to beg forgiveness to the Senate president." David J. Oakes/Minnesota State Senate hide caption

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David J. Oakes/Minnesota State Senate

What Eye Contact — And Dogs — Can Teach Us About Civility In Politics

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A direct, friendly gaze seems to help cement the bond of affection between people and their pooches. Dan Perez/Flickr hide caption

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Dan Perez/Flickr

Scientists Probe Puppy Love

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The team with SAR Dogs Nepal performs many search operations in the Himalayas. Last year they rescued five foreign trekkers and about 200 Nepalis. Courtesy of SAR Dogs Nepal hide caption

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Courtesy of SAR Dogs Nepal

Indiana "Indy" Bones reports for duty on a field investigation, in which the dog sniffs to detect human remains for a reopened cold case. Gloria Hillard for NPR hide caption

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Gloria Hillard for NPR

Police Dog On Payroll: 'Indiana Bones' Is Woman's Best Friend

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In the dog mushing world, 44-year-old Lance Mackey is like Michael Jordan. The sled dog racing veteran returns to the Yukon Quest this year. Katie Orlinsky for NPR hide caption

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Katie Orlinsky for NPR

Facing 1,000 Miles Of Frigid Winds With Loyal Dogs And Willpower

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Sled dogs prefer below-zero weather for running, says musher Cody Strathe. Some mushers now train at night, when it's colder. Courtesy Yukon Quest hide caption

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Courtesy Yukon Quest

Climate Change Puts Alaska's Sled Dog Races On Thin Ice

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A dog named Sky activates the tug sensor on the FIDO vest. The vest is a piece of wearable technology designed to allow working dogs to perform more tasks and communicate more information. Rob Felt/Courtesy of Georgia Tech hide caption

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Rob Felt/Courtesy of Georgia Tech

Sit. Stay. Call 911: FIDO Vest Gives Service Dogs An Upgrade

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