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Poliovirus, long a scourge, has been modified by Duke University researchers for experimental use as a brain cancer treatment. Juan Gaertner/Science Source hide caption

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Juan Gaertner/Science Source

A Pakistani health worker administers the oral polio vaccine to a child during a campaign in Karachi on May 7. Because of past attacks on vaccinators, security personnel are often assigned to accompany them. Rizwan Tabassum/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rizwan Tabassum/AFP/Getty Images

Why It's So Hard To Wipe Out Polio In Pakistan

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A Pakistani policeman guards a team of polio vaccinators during an immunization drive in Karachi on January 22. Officials have stepped up protection in the wake of the January 18 attack. Rizwan Tabassum/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rizwan Tabassum/AFP/Getty Images

Nurses give the oral polio vaccine to a Syrian child in a refugee camp in Turkey. The oral polio vaccine used throughout most of the developing world contains a form of the virus that has been weakened in the laboratory. But it's still a live virus. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

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Carsten Koall/Getty Images

A health official inks a child's finger to indicate she has received a polio vaccine last month at a camp of people displaced by Islamist extremists in Nigeria. Sunday Alamba/AP hide caption

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Sunday Alamba/AP

How Boko Haram Is Keeping Polio Alive In Nigeria

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Gautam Lewis, now 39, poses with some of the photographs he has taken that trace the life and work of Mother Teresa, who took him in when he was 3. The images are part of an exhibition Lewis has staged in Kolkata as an homage to the woman he calls his "second mother." Rohan Chakravarty for NPR hide caption

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Rohan Chakravarty for NPR

Mother Teresa Made Him Believe He Could Fly — And He Did

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Ado Ibrahim carries his son Aminu through a village in northern Nigeria. Aminu was paralyzed by polio in 2012. David P. Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David P. Gilkey/NPR

Polio Rears Its Head Again In Africa

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A Pakistani health worker gives a polio vaccine to students in Peshawar, Pakistan, in March. Polio remains endemic in Pakistan after the Taliban banned vaccinations, attacks targeted medical staffers and suspicions lingered about the inoculations. Mohammad Sajjad/AP hide caption

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Mohammad Sajjad/AP