Neanderthal Neanderthal

The skull of La Ferrassie Neanderthal, from France. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Some Plaque To Build A Theory On: Did Humans And Neanderthals Kiss?

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A new study of the dental plaques of three Neanderthals reveals surprising facts about their lives, including what they ate, the diseases that ailed them and how they self-medicated (and smooched). (Above) An illustration of Neanderthals in Spain shows them preparing to eat plants and mushrooms. Courtesy of Abel Grau/Comunicación CSIC hide caption

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Courtesy of Abel Grau/Comunicación CSIC

Some Neanderthals Were Vegetarian — And They Likely Kissed Our Human Ancestors

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Researchers from the Max Planck Institute excavate the East Gallery of Denisova Cave in Siberia in August 2010. With ancient bone fragments so hard to come by, being able to successfully filter dirt for the DNA of extinct human ancestors can open new doors, research-wise. Bence Viola/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology hide caption

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Bence Viola/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

Dust To Dust: Scientists Find DNA Of Human Ancestors In Cave Floor Dirt

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A reconstruction of a Neanderthal man (right) based on skull found at the La Ferrassie rock shelter in Dordogne Valley, France. He's face to face with a male Homo sapien. Philippe Plailly & Atelier Daynes/Science Source hide caption

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Philippe Plailly & Atelier Daynes/Science Source

Science Seeks Clues To Human Health In Neanderthal DNA

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Neanderthals, represented here by a museum's reconstruction, had been living in Eurasia for 200,000 years when Homo sapiens first passed through, and the communities intermingled. The same genes that today play a role in allergies very likely fostered a quick response to local bacteria, viruses and other pathogens, scientists say. Pierre Andrieu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pierre Andrieu/AFP/Getty Images

Itchy Eyes? Sneezing? Maybe Blame That Allergy On Neanderthals

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An inside view of this fossil Pseudodon shell shows that the hole made by Homo erectus is exactly at the spot where the muscle attached to the shell. Poking at that spot would force the shell open. Henk Caspers/Naturalis Leiden/The Netherlands hide caption

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Henk Caspers/Naturalis Leiden/The Netherlands

Earliest Human Engraving Or Trash From An Ancient Lunch?

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A rendering of Neanderthals cooking and eating. The ancient humans inhabited Europe and western Asia between 230,000 and 29,000 years ago. Mauricio Anton/Science Source hide caption

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Mauricio Anton/Science Source

Love your hair. Artists' depictions of a Neanderthal man and woman at the Neanderthal Museum in Mettmann, Germany. Martin Meissner/AP hide caption

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Martin Meissner/AP

Neanderthal Genes Live On In Our Hair And Skin

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Research excavations like these in Siberia's Denisova Cave are yielding clues to the mating choices of early hominids. Bence Viola/Nature hide caption

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Bence Viola/Nature

Mixing It Up 50,000 Years Ago — Who Slept With Whom?

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