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The Food and Drug Administration quickly identified romaine lettuce as the source of a months-long outbreak, but the foodborne illness investigation has been one of the agency's most complicated in years. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

What Sparked An E. Coli Outbreak In Lettuce? Scientists Trace A Surprising Source

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A man shops for vegetables near romaine lettuce for sale at a supermarket in California, where the first death from the E. coli outbreak was reported. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

"Bee health remains of paramount importance for me," said the EU's Commissioner for Health and Food Safety, after the EU moved to ban neonicotinoid insecticides everywhere except greenhouses. Here, a bee hovers near a peach flower. Jamal Saidi/Reuters hide caption

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Jamal Saidi/Reuters

In 2011, the Food and Drug Administration sent an advisory about an outbreak of listeria linked to cantaloupes killed 33 people. Gosia Wozniacka/AP hide caption

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Gosia Wozniacka/AP

FDA Not Doing Enough To Fix Serious Food Safety Violations, Report Finds

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For the first time, scientists have carefully analyzed all the critters in a kitchen sponge. There turns out to be a huge number. Despite recent news reports, there is something you can do about it. Joy Ho for NPR hide caption

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Joy Ho for NPR

So Your Kitchen Sponge Is A Bacteria Hotbed. Here's What To Do

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You may be tempted to save a piece of a moldy loaf by discarding the fuzzy bits. But food safety experts say molds penetrate deeper into the food than what's visible to us. And eating moldy food comes with health risks. Alex Reynolds/NPR hide caption

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Alex Reynolds/NPR

Brazilians are prolific meat-eaters, so they are struggling with allegations that health officials accepted bribes to allow subpar meat on the market. Victor Moriyama/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Victor Moriyama/Bloomberg/Getty Images

"Sell by" and "expiration" labels on food products may contribute to food waste by misleading consumers to throwing away perfectly good food. Now, two food industry associations are encouraging food companies to do away with these labels. Ryan Eskalis/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Eskalis/NPR

Cookie dough clings to the beaters of a standing mixer. The Food and Drug Administration is warning people not to eat raw dough due to an ongoing outbreak of illnesses linked to flour tainted with E. coli. Larry Crowe/AP hide caption

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Larry Crowe/AP

A Caesar salad kit. Americans buy twice as many packages of bagged salad greens as heads of lettuce these days. Is the bagged stuff just as good? If it gets you to eat more leafy greens, yes. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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Morgan McCloy/NPR

As Bagged Salad Kits Boom, Americans Eat More Greens

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A typical label includes safe cooking instructions. This label on blade-tenderized beef sold at Costco recommends 160 degrees as the minimum internal temperature, which doesn't require a three-minute rest time. Lydia Zuraw/KHN for NPR hide caption

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Lydia Zuraw/KHN for NPR

A Chipotle restaurant at Union Station in Washington, D.C. The company's food-safety troubles have provoked quite a bit of schadenfreude in the rest of the food industry. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

Chipotle's Food-Safety Woes? Don't Expect Sympathy From Rest Of Industry

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A passerby walks past a Chipotle restaurant in Seattle in November that closed following one of two E.coli outbreaks that sickened scores of people. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Chipotle Faces A Criminal Investigation Into Its Handling Of A Norovirus Outbreak

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Chipotle Mexican Grill founder and CEO Steve Ells, shown here in an interview with The Associated Press last month, says the company intends to become a leader in food safety. Stephen Brashear/AP hide caption

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Stephen Brashear/AP

After Chipotle Outbreaks, Will 'Food With Integrity' Still Resonate?

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Ayesha Mumtaz inspects food during a raid on a backyard sweets factory in Lahore, Pakistan. Her campaign to clean up the kitchens and food factories of Pakistan has earned her the nickname "The Fearless One." Philip Reeves/NPR hide caption

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Philip Reeves/NPR

Lahore's Food Safety Czar Declares 'War' On Unhygienic Food

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A woman washes dishes on the street in Hanoi, Vietnam. The World Health Organization says the burden of foodborne disease in Southeast Asia is one of the highest in the world. Luong Thai Linh/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Luong Thai Linh/EPA/Landov