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People try to get through the aisles at Whole Foods Market in Midtown in New York on Sunday before the storm. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images

Red clover sprouts are pretty, but they and other sprouts have been linked to too much foodborne illness for major grocers to continue carrying them. Stephanie Phillips/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Stephanie Phillips/iStockphoto.com

This apple-topped salad is one of several products being recalled for potential contamination with the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes Ready Pac, Inc. hide caption

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Ready Pac, Inc.

Tomatoes getting a splash of water reinforces the notion that McDonald's food is wholesome in China, as seen in this video screengrab. McDonald's China hide caption

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McDonald's China

McDonald's Food Has A Healthy Glow, At Least In China

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Miller Farms in Maryland is a family-run operation that sells its home-grown vegetables at farmers' markets and local grocery stores. Phil Miller, whose family owns the farm, says he's trying to earn a food safety certification now required by many food buyers. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

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Maggie Starbard/NPR

A clampdown on contamination in growing fields has pushed out wildlife and destroyed habitats. Adam Cole/NPR hide caption

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Adam Cole/NPR

How Making Food Safe Can Harm Wildlife And Water

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Adam Cole/NPR

Your Salad: A Search For Where The Wild Things Were

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A worker monitors the loading of containers on to a ship at a harbor in China's Shandong province. Under a new U.S. law, Chinese food exporters will now have to share more food safety information with American food importers. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images