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An employee handles sides of pork on a conveyor at a Smithfield Foods Inc. pork processing facility in Milan, Mo. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

USDA Offers Pork Companies A New Inspection Plan, Despite Opposition

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Costco Wholesale requires its food suppliers to undergo annual inspections and requires some produce suppliers to hold shipments until tests come back negative for disease-causing bacteria. Mark Peterson/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Peterson/Corbis via Getty Images

Don't Panic: The Government Shutdown Isn't Making Food Unsafe

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Investigators who are trying to track down the source of E. coli in romaine lettuce have seen this before. They're tracking the exact strain of bacteria that caused a small outbreak a year ago. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Investigators Tracking Latest Romaine Lettuce Outbreak Are Feeling Some Deja Vu

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Harvey Washington Wiley was instrumental in bringing about regulations to boost sanitation and decrease food adulteration. Historical/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Historical/Corbis via Getty Images

How A 19th Century Chemist Took On The Food Industry With A Grisly Experiment

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Daniel Fishel for NPR

Food Safety Scares Are Up In 2018. Here's Why You Shouldn't Freak Out

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The Food and Drug Administration quickly identified romaine lettuce as the source of a months-long outbreak, but the foodborne illness investigation has been one of the agency's most complicated in years. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

What Sparked An E. Coli Outbreak In Lettuce? Scientists Trace A Surprising Source

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A man shops for vegetables near romaine lettuce for sale at a supermarket in California, where the first death from the E. coli outbreak was reported. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

"Bee health remains of paramount importance for me," said the EU's Commissioner for Health and Food Safety, after the EU moved to ban neonicotinoid insecticides everywhere except greenhouses. Here, a bee hovers near a peach flower. Jamal Saidi/Reuters hide caption

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Jamal Saidi/Reuters

In 2011, the Food and Drug Administration sent an advisory about an outbreak of listeria linked to cantaloupes killed 33 people. Gosia Wozniacka/AP hide caption

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Gosia Wozniacka/AP

FDA Not Doing Enough To Fix Serious Food Safety Violations, Report Finds

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For the first time, scientists have carefully analyzed all the critters in a kitchen sponge. There turns out to be a huge number. Despite recent news reports, there is something you can do about it. Joy Ho for NPR hide caption

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Joy Ho for NPR

So Your Kitchen Sponge Is A Bacteria Hotbed. Here's What To Do

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