chocolate chocolate

A cocoa farmer opens cacao pods with a stick to collect cocoa beans at his farm in Beni in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Eduardo Soteras/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Eduardo Soteras/AFP/Getty Images

A machine coined "The Enrober" provides the "Willy Wonka moment" of MoonPie-making, when the treats are propelled under a gooey chocolate waterfall. Melanie Peeples for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Melanie Peeples for NPR

Even After 100 Years, People Are Still Reaching For The Moon(Pie)

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/565725694/566438913" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Entrepreneurs sort cocoa beans on a tray at Cacao de Origen, a school founded by Maria Di Giacobbe to train Venezuelan women in the making of premium chocolate. Zeina Alvarado (left) later found work in a bean-to-bar production facility in Mexico. Courtesy of Cacao de Origen hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Cacao de Origen

Thieves made off with a refrigerated trailer packed with Nutella, Kinder Surprise eggs and other treats in Neustadt, Germany. Allison Hare/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Allison Hare/Flickr
Daniel Fishel for NPR

Eating Chocolate, A Little Each Week, May Lower The Risk Of A Heart Flutter

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/529843647/529893167" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Farmer Georges Kouamé Koffi holding two cocoa pods. Chocolate is made from the almond-sized cocoa beans contained in the pods. Alex Duval Smith for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Duval Smith for NPR

A Dip In Global Prices Creates Cocoa Crisis For Ivory Coast's Farmers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/518328252/518391715" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Cacao pods ready for harvest at the Loiza Dark Chocolate farm. Courtesy of Loiza Dark Chocolate hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Loiza Dark Chocolate

Reviving Puerto Rico's Cocoa Farms, Centuries After Hurricanes Destroyed Them

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/516913761/517988208" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

New York City restaurant Serendipity 3 makes the "Quintessential Grilled Cheese Sandwich," made with gold leaf, accompanied by the gold-adorned South African Lobster & San Marzano Tomato Bisque, for sandwich-dipping, of course. Courtesy of Liz Steger hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Liz Steger

People walk past the entrance of the parking garage where reporter Bob Woodward held late night meetings with Deep Throat, his Watergate source who later turned out to be Mark Felt, the FBI's former No. 2 official. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Thousands Of Toys Wash Ashore On German Island

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/509305185/509673166" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Researchers are recruiting volunteers to participate in a four-year study trial of cocoa extract. Half of the participants will take capsules containing about as much cocoa extract as you'd get from eating about 1,000 calories of dark chocolate. Dennis Gottlieb/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Dennis Gottlieb/Getty Images

A Chocolate Pill? Scientists To Test Whether Cocoa Extract Boosts Health

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/491195004/491770370" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript