antibiotics antibiotics

Cattle graze in a field near Sacramento, Calif. California Gov. Jerry Brown, along with many health advocacy groups, has called the overuse of antibiotics "an urgent public health problem." Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Leif Parsons for NPR

Can You Protect Your Tummy From Traveler's Diarrhea?

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To Avoid Intestinal Distress While Traveling Overseas, Skip The Ceviche

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Patients receive treatment at the Chest Disease Hospital in Srinagar, India. The country has one of the highest rates of drug-resistant tuberculosis in the world, in part because antibiotics for the disease are poorly regulated by the government. Dar Yasin/AP hide caption

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Dar Yasin/AP

As Antibiotic Resistance Spreads, WHO Plans Strategy To Fight It

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Tyson Foods says it has already reduced its use of human-use antibiotics by 80 percent over the past four years. Here, Tyson frozen chicken on display at Piazza's market in Palo Alto, Calif., in 2010. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/AP

Tyson Foods To Stop Giving Chickens Antibiotics Used By Humans

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An order of McDonald's Chicken McNuggets in Olmsted Falls, Ohio. McDonald's says it plans to start using chicken raised without antibiotics important to human medicine. Mark Duncan/AP hide caption

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Mark Duncan/AP

An employee of the drug company Apotex, examines some Ciprofloxacin at the plant in Canada. Cipro is commonly given to travelers for diarrhea. More than 20 million Cipro doses are prescribed each year in the U.S. Getty Images hide caption

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You don't want to run into methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria. A potential new antibiotic could help fight this bug. CDC hide caption

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CDC

Scientists Hit Antibiotic Pay Dirt Growing Finicky Bacteria In Lab

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David Livermore, the director of the Antibiotic Resistance Monitoring and Reference Laboratory in London, studies a new class of superbugs, called carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE. Suzanne Plunkett/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Suzanne Plunkett/Reuters /Landov