antibiotics antibiotics

Chicks in the Perdue hatchery in Salisbury, Md. The company says that it is now raising all of its chickens without routine antibiotics. Only those flocks that get sick, about 5 percent of all birds, will be treated. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Christian Choe, Zach Rosenthal, and Maria Filsinger Interrante, who call themselves Team Lyseia, strategize about experiments to test their new antibiotics. Linda A. Cicero/Stanford News /Courtesy of Stanford University hide caption

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Linda A. Cicero/Stanford News /Courtesy of Stanford University

Young Inventors Work On Secret Proteins To Thwart Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

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Once scientists grew these Staphylococcus lugdunensis bacteria in a lab dish, they were able to isolate a compound that's lethal to another strain commonly found in the nose that can make us sick — Staphylococcus aureus. Mostly Harmless/Flickr hide caption

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Mostly Harmless/Flickr

'Nose-y' Bacteria Could Yield A New Way To Fight Infection

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A Pennsylvania woman developed a urinary tract infection cased by Escherichia coli bacteria that were found to be resistant to colistin, an antibiotic that is seen as the last line of defense. Nature's Geometry/Science Source hide caption

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Nature's Geometry/Science Source

Syphilis can be wiped out with one to three shots of penicillin. PhotoAlto/Eric Audras/Getty Images hide caption

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PhotoAlto/Eric Audras/Getty Images

Penicillin Shortage Could Be A Problem For People With Syphilis

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At the Iowa State University Beef Nutrition Farm, the cattle eat carefully formulated rations. Researchers there are trying to test new types of animal feed. Amy Mayer/Iowa Public Radio hide caption

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Amy Mayer/Iowa Public Radio

Cattle graze in a field near Sacramento, Calif. California Gov. Jerry Brown, along with many health advocacy groups, has called the overuse of antibiotics "an urgent public health problem." Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP
Leif Parsons for NPR

Can You Protect Your Tummy From Traveler's Diarrhea?

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