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Cattle eating a mixture of antibiotic-free corn and hay at Corrin Farms, near Neola, Iowa. Their meat is sold by Niman Ranch. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Some In The Beef Industry Are Bucking The Widespread Use Of Antibiotics. Here's How

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Scientists have isolated a molecule with disease-fighting potential in a microbe living on a type of fungus-farming ant (genus Cyphomyrmex). The microbe kills off other hostile microbes attacking the ants' fungus, a food source. Courtesy of Alexander Wild/University of Wisconsin hide caption

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Courtesy of Alexander Wild/University of Wisconsin

We might all feel a lot better if we saw a view like this, from the North Shore of Oahu, every day. Vince Cavataio/Perspectives/Getty Images hide caption

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Vince Cavataio/Perspectives/Getty Images

The micromotor device may someday be used to deliver antibiotics to the stomach. Angewandte Chemie International Edition hide caption

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Angewandte Chemie International Edition

This Tiny Submarine Cruises Inside A Stomach To Deliver Drugs

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Antibiotic- and growth-hormone-free cattle gather at a farm in Yamhill, Ore. Despite farmers pledging to reduce or stop antibiotics use, a new report finds that sales of antibiotics for use on farms are going up. Don Ryan/AP hide caption

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Don Ryan/AP

Chicks in the Perdue hatchery in Salisbury, Md. The company says that it is now raising all of its chickens without routine antibiotics. Only those flocks that get sick, about 5 percent of all birds, will be treated. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Christian Choe, Zach Rosenthal, and Maria Filsinger Interrante, who call themselves Team Lyseia, strategize about experiments to test their new antibiotics. Linda A. Cicero/Stanford News /Courtesy of Stanford University hide caption

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Linda A. Cicero/Stanford News /Courtesy of Stanford University

Young Inventors Work On Secret Proteins To Thwart Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

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