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In these images, E. coli bacteria harbor proteins from a bacteria-killing virus that can eavesdrop on bacterial communication. At left, one protein from the virus has been tagged with a red marker. At right, the virus has overheard bacterial communication indicating the bacteria have achieved a quorum; it sends its protein to the poles of the cell (yellow dots). Bonnie Bassler and Justin Silpe, Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University hide caption

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Bonnie Bassler and Justin Silpe, Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University

Thomas "Uptown T" Stewart (left), has been shucking oysters at Pascal's Manale restaurant for more than 30 years, about as long as Paula (middle) and Brent Coussou have been going there. Travis Lux/WWNO hide caption

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Travis Lux/WWNO

University of Oregon scientists used real dust from inside homes around Portland to test the effects of sunlight, UV light and darkness on bacteria found in the dust. Dave G Kelly/Getty Images hide caption

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Dave G Kelly/Getty Images

It's a bacteria-eat-bacteria world, scientists say. Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus, shown here in false color, attacks common germs six times its size, then devours them from the inside out. Alfred Pasieka/Science Source hide caption

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Alfred Pasieka/Science Source

'Predatory Bacteria' Might Be Enlisted In Defense Against Antibiotic Resistance

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Paige Vickers for NPR

Probiotics For Babies And Kids? New Research Explores Good Bacteria

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Mice may be adorable, but the droppings and the bacteria they contain, not so much. Mchugh Tom/Science Source/Getty Images hide caption

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Mchugh Tom/Science Source/Getty Images

New York City Mice Carry Bacteria That Can Make People Sick

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The CDC is trying to stop E. coli and other bacteria that have become resistant to antibiotics because they can cause a deadly infection. Science Photo Library/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

Federal Efforts To Control Rare And Deadly Bacteria Working

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What scientists believe to be our oldest ancestor, the single-celled organism named LUCA, likely lived in extreme conditions where magma met water — in a setting similar to this one from Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Danita Delimont/Getty Images/Gallo Images hide caption

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Danita Delimont/Getty Images/Gallo Images

A block of Tomme de Savoie cheese ages with a sweater of Mucor lanceolatus fungal mold. Mucor itself doesn't have a strong taste, but more flavorful bacteria can travel far and wide along its hyphae — the microscopic, branched tendrils that fungi use to bring in nutrients. Benjamin Wolfe/Benjamin Wolfe hide caption

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Benjamin Wolfe/Benjamin Wolfe
Varham Muradyan for NPR

Are There Zombie Viruses In The Thawing Permafrost?

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Could Probiotics Protect Kids From A Downside Of Antibiotics?

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NASA astronaut Kate Rubins floats in the International Space Station in September 2016, wearing a spacesuit decorated by patients recovering at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. NASA Johnson/Flickr hide caption

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NASA Johnson/Flickr

A Microbe Hunter Plies Her Trade In Space

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On the list of pathogens (from left): Staphylococcus aureus (causes skin infections, pneumonia, bloodstream infections), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (causes blood infections, pneumonia, infections after surgery) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (causes the sexually-transmitted disease gonorrhea). NIAID; Scott Chimileski and Roberto Kolter, NIH Image Gallery/Flickr; NIAID hide caption

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NIAID; Scott Chimileski and Roberto Kolter, NIH Image Gallery/Flickr; NIAID

The bacteria were discovered in New Mexico's Lechuguilla Cave — a part of Carlsbad Caverns and the second deepest cave in the continental U.S. Courtesy of Max Wisshak hide caption

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Courtesy of Max Wisshak

Million-Year-Old 'Hero Bug' Emerges From Cave

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The FDA says there's no evidence that antibacterial soaps do a better job cleaning hands, and chemicals in them may pose health hazards. The FDA ban applies only to consumer products, not those used in hospitals and food service settings. Mike Kemp/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Kemp/Blend Images/Getty Images