constitution constitution

Deeba Jafri gives Hena Zuberi a kiss as they protest in front of Supreme Court on Wednesday as the court heard arguments over the Trump Administration's travel ban. Tyrone Turner/WAMU hide caption

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Tyrone Turner/WAMU

In Intense Arguments, Supreme Court Appears Ready To Side With Trump On Travel Ban

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Altogether, the Constitution has only been amended 17 times since the Bill of Rights, and one of those amendments (the 21st) was done just to repeal another (the 18th, known as Prohibition). National Archives via AP hide caption

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National Archives via AP

President Trump signs the Veterans Choice Program Extension and Improvement Act at the White House in April. When they sign legislation, presidents can issue a "signing statement" to share their legal interpretation of the new law. Trump did so with the Russia sanctions law. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Like Presidents Past, Trump Adds A Signing Statement To A Bill He Doesn't Like

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When interests such as the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., take money from foreign governments, it's a potential violation of the Constitution, according to the group that filed the lawsuit. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Ammon Bundy, the leader of an anti-government militia, carries a copy of the U.S. Constitution in his pocket. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Bundy Militia Not Backing Down Following Oregon Trial Acquittal

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Members of the National Reform Council at Parliament House in Bangkok on Sunday following a vote to reject the new draft constitution they spent nine months writing. Narong Sangnak/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Narong Sangnak/EPA/Landov

Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, speaks during the Iowa Faith and Freedom Coalition's Friends of the Family Banquet in Des Moines, Iowa, in November 2013. Lee is one of the few candidates calling for 17th Amendment repeal who have won office. Justin Hayworth/AP hide caption

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Justin Hayworth/AP