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A team at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore is developing a tumor-detecting algorithm for detecting pancreatic cancer. But first, they have to train computers to distinguish between organs. Courtesy of The Felix Project hide caption

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Courtesy of The Felix Project

For Some Hard-To-Find Tumors, Doctors See Promise In Artificial Intelligence

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An Axon body camera worn by an officer with the Los Angeles Police Department. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Body Camera Maker Weighs Adding Facial Recognition Technology

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Google CEO Sundar Pichai demonstrated new AI technology that can use human-like speech to carry on phone conversations at the Google I/O 2018 Conference on Tuesday in Mountain View, Calif. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

First responders in the Marina District disaster zone after an earthquake on October 17, 1989 in San Francisco, Calif. Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images hide caption

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Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images

Betting On Artificial Intelligence To Guide Earthquake Response

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SenseTime's technology is able to identify specific attributes of vehicles and people. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

Facial Recognition In China Is Big Business As Local Governments Boost Surveillance

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Invisibilia: Do the Patterns in Your Past Predict Your Future?

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A robot sweeps the floor at the main press center at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics. Steve Russell/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Russell/Toronto Star via Getty Images
Sam Rowe for NPR

Can Computers Learn Like Humans?

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Abu Qader, 18, came to the U.S. from Afghanistan as a baby. Now a freshman at Cornell University, he has founded a medical technology company with the goal of improving diagnosis of breast cancer in poor countries. Robert Barker/Cornell University hide caption

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Robert Barker/Cornell University
Michelle Kondrich for NPR

Alexa, Are You Safe For My Kids?

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A full-scale figure of a "T-800" terminator robot used in the movie Terminator 2, is displayed at a preview of the Terminator Exhibition in Tokyo in 2009. Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images

Lawmakers: Don't Gauge Artificial Intelligence By What You See In The Movies

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Taxis park along the footpath in Adelaide, Australia. Alva Noe asks: Do taxi apps make people interact less — or better — with their drivers? sasimoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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sasimoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto

A Knightscope K5 security robot roamed the Prudential Center in Boston in May. Will it be the next robot to question its existence? Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe/Getty Images

I Sink, Therefore I Am: This Robot Wasn't Programmed For Existential Angst

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Artificial intelligence poses an existential risk to human civilization, Elon Musk (right) told the National Governors Association meeting Saturday in Providence, R.I. Stephan Savoia/AP hide caption

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Stephan Savoia/AP