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Motherboards coordinate all the processes inside a computer. debs-eye/Flickr hide caption

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debs-eye/Flickr

Should This Exist? The Ethics Of New Technology

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Amazon boxes are scanned on conveyor belts. AI systems keep track of all items in the warehouses, which can be as vast as 1 million square feet. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Optimized Prime: How AI And Anticipation Power Amazon's 1-Hour Deliveries

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New research explores how people think autonomous vehicles should handle moral dilemmas. Here, people walk in front of an autonomous taxi being demonstrated in Frankfurt, Germany, last year. Andreas Arnold/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andreas Arnold/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Scientists find that the whiskers of harbor seals help them distinguish predator from prey — even from a distance. Douglas Klug/Images hide caption

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Douglas Klug/Images

Need To Track A Submarine? A Harbor Seal Can Show You How

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An autonomous tank is demonstrated in France last month. Leading researchers in artificial intelligence are calling for laws against lethal autonomous weapons. They also pledge not to work on such weapons. Christophe Morin/IP3/Getty Images hide caption

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Christophe Morin/IP3/Getty Images

Siri, Alexa and Cortana all started out as female. Now a group of marketing executives, tech experts and academics are trying to make virtual assistants more egalitarian. Donald Iain Smith/Getty Images/Blend Images hide caption

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Donald Iain Smith/Getty Images/Blend Images

The Push For A Gender-Neutral Siri

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

When Scientists Develop Products From Personal Medical Data, Who Gets To Profit?

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A team at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore is developing a tumor-detecting algorithm for detecting pancreatic cancer. But first, they have to train computers to distinguish between organs. Courtesy of The Felix Project hide caption

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Courtesy of The Felix Project

For Some Hard-To-Find Tumors, Doctors See Promise In Artificial Intelligence

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An Axon body camera worn by an officer with the Los Angeles Police Department. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Body Camera Maker Weighs Adding Facial Recognition Technology

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Google CEO Sundar Pichai demonstrated new AI technology that can use human-like speech to carry on phone conversations at the Google I/O 2018 Conference on Tuesday in Mountain View, Calif. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images