artificial intelligence artificial intelligence

A robot sweeps the floor at the main press center at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics. Steve Russell/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Russell/Toronto Star via Getty Images
Sam Rowe for NPR

Can Computers Learn Like Humans?

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Abu Qader, 18, came to the U.S. from Afghanistan as a baby. Now a freshman at Cornell University, he has founded a medical technology company with the goal of improving diagnosis of breast cancer in poor countries. Robert Barker/Cornell University hide caption

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Robert Barker/Cornell University
Michelle Kondrich for NPR

Alexa, Are You Safe For My Kids?

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A full-scale figure of a "T-800" terminator robot used in the movie Terminator 2, is displayed at a preview of the Terminator Exhibition in Tokyo in 2009. Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images

Lawmakers: Don't Gauge Artificial Intelligence By What You See In The Movies

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Taxis park along the footpath in Adelaide, Australia. Alva Noe asks: Do taxi apps make people interact less — or better — with their drivers? sasimoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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sasimoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto

A Knightscope K5 security robot roamed the Prudential Center in Boston in May. Will it be the next robot to question its existence? Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe/Getty Images

I Sink, Therefore I Am: This Robot Wasn't Programmed For Existential Angst

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Artificial intelligence poses an existential risk to human civilization, Elon Musk (right) told the National Governors Association meeting Saturday in Providence, R.I. Stephan Savoia/AP hide caption

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Stephan Savoia/AP