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Jenn Liv for NPR

Personalized Diets: Can Your Genes Really Tell You What To Eat?

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Paige Vickers for NPR

Resolved To Lose Weight? We Gave Food-Tracking Apps A Try

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Michael Jacobson (right) and Bonnie Liebman, CSPI's director of nutrition, launching a campaign against over-salted food in the late 1970s. Courtesy of Center for Science in the Public Interest hide caption

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Courtesy of Center for Science in the Public Interest

A Pioneer Of Food Activism Steps Down, Looks Back

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Amelia Earhart eats dinner at a Cleveland hotel. Her in-flight menu, however, was usually simple, often consisting of tomato juice and a hard-boiled egg. Louis Van Oeyen/Western Reserve Historical Society/Getty Images hide caption

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Louis Van Oeyen/Western Reserve Historical Society/Getty Images

For children over 1 year old, pediatricians strongly recommend whole fruit instead of juice, because it contains fiber, which slows the absorption of sugar and fills you up the way juice doesn't. KathyDewar/Getty Images hide caption

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KathyDewar/Getty Images

Archaeologists have suggested that Stone Age people sometimes ate one another for nutritional reasons. But a new study suggests that from a calorie perspective, hunting and eating other humans wasn't efficient. Publiphoto/Science Source hide caption

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Publiphoto/Science Source

A woman farmers harvests pearl millet in Andhra Pradesh, India. Millets were once a steady part of Indians' diets until the Green Revolution, which encouraged farmers to grow wheat and rice. Now, the grains are slowly making a comeback. Courtesy of L.Vidyasagar hide caption

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Courtesy of L.Vidyasagar

Which eating plan will work with your lifestyle and help you lose weight? U.S.News & World Report has plenty of advice with its latest diet rankings. Maximilian Stock Ltd./Getty Images hide caption

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Maximilian Stock Ltd./Getty Images

A molecular biologist is studying how excess sugar might alter brain chemistry, leading to overeating and eventually, obesity. Veronica Grech/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Veronica Grech/Ikon Images/Getty Images

This Scientist Is Trying To Unravel What Sugar Does To The Brain

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Kai Schreiber/Flickr

Food For Thought: The Subtle Forces That Affect Your Appetite

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