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earthquakes

A resident looks at the rubble of St. Catherine church on Tuesday, including the toppled head of a statue, following a 6.1 magnitude earthquake in Pampanga province northwest of Manila the previous day. Bullit Marquez/AP hide caption

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Bullit Marquez/AP

A map shows earthquake faults in part of Southern California. Scientists using hundreds of graphics processors found that the region experienced 1.81 million temblors over a decade-long span — 10 times more than what had previously been detected. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission, shown in an artist's rendering, will measure tiny fluctuations in Earth's gravitational field to show how water moves around the planet. NASA/JPL hide caption

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NASA/JPL

NASA Launching New Satellites To Measure Earth's Lumpy Gravity

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A 6.2 magnitude earthquake devastated central Italy, destroying numerous villages, including Accumoli. Rescue teams are searching for survivors and victims. Michele Amoruso/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Michele Amoruso/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

Large cracks in the sidewalk in Coyle, Okla., appeared after several earthquakes on Jan. 24. J Pat Carter/Getty Images hide caption

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J Pat Carter/Getty Images

U.S. Geology Maps Reveal Areas Vulnerable To Man-Made Quakes

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Rescue workers used heavy equipment to look for survivors trapped in a building that collapsed in a magnitude-6.4 earthquake in the southern Taiwanese city of Tainan. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images

After a magnitude-4.5 earthquake was recorded near Cushing in October, Oklahoma regulators ordered oil companies to shut down several disposal wells. That seemed to slow the shaking — at least for a while. Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma

Confidence In Oil Hub Security Shaken By Oklahoma Earthquakes

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Gary Matli, a field supervisor with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, inspects a disposal well located east of Guthrie, Okla. Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma

Faced With Spate Of Tremors, Oklahoma Looks To Shake Up Its Oil Regulations

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