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The Monopoly Ultimate Banking Game from Hasbro is displayed at Toy Fair in New York, in 2016. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File) Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

A male ruby-throated hummingbird is one of the birds featured in the board game Wingspan. Elise Amendola / AP hide caption

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Elise Amendola / AP

Klaus Teuber, creator of the popular board game Catan, with his son Benjamin Teuber, a managing director at Catan Inc. Celebrating the 25th anniversary of the game's launch, the elder Teuber has released an autobiography, My Way to Catan. Patrick Liste hide caption

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Patrick Liste

Families Stuck At Home Turn To Board Game Catan, Sending Sales Skyrocketing

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You can't play games like Lost Cities and Mystic Vale with your friends in person right now, but you can still play them online. Petra Mayer/NPR hide caption

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Petra Mayer/NPR

As people make efforts to stay apart from each other physically, video games are filling the socializing gap. Sara Monika/Getty Images hide caption

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Sara Monika/Getty Images

The game Buffalo prompts players to think of people that buck stereotypes, and subliminally challenges those stereotypes in the process. Maanvi Singh for NPR hide caption

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Maanvi Singh for NPR

Fighting Bias With Board Games

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"It's easier for me to sell direct to a customer now," says James Ernest, co-creator of the game Unexploded Cow. The board game is one of the most popular created by Ernest, who's made ample use of crowdfunding sites. Courtesy of Cheapass Games hide caption

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Courtesy of Cheapass Games

Amid Board Game Boom, Designers Roll The Dice On Odd Ideas — Even Exploding Cows

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The deconstructed, hexagonal salad nicoise: perfect for all your gourmand geek friends. Courtesy of Chris-Rachel Oseland hide caption

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Courtesy of Chris-Rachel Oseland

This Australian version of Monopoly shows some updates - check out the laptop. But a new edition puts a computerized banker in control of every move. Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images hide caption

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Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images