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Leah Steimel (center) says she would consider buying insurance through a Medicaid-style plan that the New Mexico Legislature is considering. Her family includes (from left) her husband, Wellington Guzman; their daughter, Amelia; and sons Daniel and Jonathan. Courtesy of Leah Steimel hide caption

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Courtesy of Leah Steimel

New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham said on Tuesday that President Trump's "border fear-mongering" had misused National Guard troops in her state. The governor is seen here in a photo from Monday. Morgan Lee/AP hide caption

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Morgan Lee/AP

Migrants, one carrying a child, who plan to turn themselves over to U.S. border agents, walk up the embankment after climbing over a U.S. border wall from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, last week. On Tuesday, members of the Hispanic Caucus called for improved medical facilities and trained personnel at ports of entry. Moises Castillo/AP hide caption

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Moises Castillo/AP

Gavin Clarkson of Las Cruces, N.M., speaks at the Albuquerque bureau of The Associated Press earlier this year. On Nov. 20, a Washington, D.C., court clerk failed to recognize New Mexico as a state and said Clarkson's driver's license was not a valid ID for obtaining a marriage license. Russell Contreras/AP hide caption

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Russell Contreras/AP

Geoff Walser picks out a ristra, a wreath-like decoration made from dried chiles, to purchase at the annual Pueblo Chile and Frijoles Festival, which draws thousands of chile lovers from Colorado and beyond. Andy Cross/Denver Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Andy Cross/Denver Post/Getty Images

The Sunspot Solar Observatory in New Mexico mysteriously shut down for 11 days in September, citing a security issue. Authorities were investigating a janitor for distribution of pornography. Sunspot Solar Observatory/https://sunspot.solar/ hide caption

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Sunspot Solar Observatory/https://sunspot.solar/

In this Aug. 13, photo, Jany Leveille sits in court during a hearing, in Taos, N.M. Leveille, her partner Siraj Ibn Wahhaj, and three other adults were denied bail by a federal judge who said the New Mexico compound residents posed a threat to the community. Roberto E. Rosales/AP hide caption

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Roberto E. Rosales/AP

First responders work the scene of a collision between a Greyhound passenger bus and a semi-truck Thursday on Interstate 40 near the town of Thoreau, N.M., near the Arizona border. Multiple people were killed and others were seriously injured. Chris Jones/AP hide caption

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Chris Jones/AP

Officials confirmed on Thursday that the remains of a toddler found in a New Mexico compound are those of the missing Georgia child. National Center for Missing & Exploited Children via AP hide caption

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National Center for Missing & Exploited Children via AP

Defendant Siraj Wahhaj and four others have been charged with child abuse stemming from the alleged neglect of 11 children found living on a squalid compound in New Mexico. Roberto E. Rosales/AP hide caption

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Roberto E. Rosales/AP

A rural New Mexico compound that was searched for a missing child. Officials announced they found the body of a young boy at the compound on Monday, but have not determined his identity. Taos County Sheriff/AP hide caption

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Taos County Sheriff/AP

An aerial photo released by the Taos County Sheriff's Office shows the rural compound where 11 children were rescued from squalid conditions on Friday. Taos County Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Taos County Sheriff's Office via AP

People enjoy a hot afternoon at the Astoria Pool in the borough of Queens on July 2, 2018 in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Opinion: We Should Turn Down The Volume Of This Hot Summer

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Gary Stone of the Otero County Cattlemen's Association says ranchers held off activists who wanted a Bundy-style protest over control of federal land. Instead they waged their battle in the courts. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

In Rural New Mexico, Ranchers Wage Their Battle Through The Courts

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Oil pump jacks work behind a natural gas flare near Watford City, N.D., in 2014. The oil and gas industry is lobbying lawmakers to repeal a rule that aims to limit the emissions of methane, the chief component of natural gas. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Inside The Debate Over Repealing Curbs On Methane Leaks

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Baerbel Schmidt/Getty Images

Schools Will Soon Have To Put In Writing If They 'Lunch Shame'

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New Mexico state Sen. Michael Padilla says he has heard of "lunch shaming" practices around the country, including students being given different food if they can't afford the regular hot lunch. Don Bartletti/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Don Bartletti/LA Times via Getty Images

Lawmaker's Childhood Experience Drives New Mexico's 'Lunch Shaming' Ban

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