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Protesters on both sides of the abortion debate demonstrated in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in July concerning Justice Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation. It is thought that a challenge to Roe v. Wade could have a chance of passing now that he is confirmed. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Abortion opponents see the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court as an opportunity to push for further abortion restrictions. Abortion supporters are preparing for a fight. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

With Kavanaugh Confirmed, Both Sides Of Abortion Debate Gear Up For Battle

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Dr. Leana Wen, health commissioner for the Baltimore City Health Department, talks about the effectiveness of contraception for public school students in 2015. Wen will be the new head of Planned Parenthood Federation of America. Kim Hairston/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Kim Hairston/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

Abortion-rights supporters in Seattle protest on Tuesday against President Trump and his choice of federal appeals Judge Brett Kavanaugh as his second nominee to the Supreme Court. Activists are preparing for the possibility that Kavanaugh's confirmation could weaken abortion rights. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Abortion Rights Advocates Preparing For Life After Roe v. Wade

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Abortion-rights proponents protest outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday. The retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy set the stage for a battle over abortion rights unlike any in a generation. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

What Justice Kennedy's Retirement Means For Abortion Rights

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Staff members hold an informal meeting before opening the STD free clinic in February in Portland, Maine. The CDC recorded more than 2 million cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis nationally in 2016 — the highest number of reported cases yet, officials say. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald/Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald/Press Herald via Getty Images

ACLU of Iowa legal director Rita Bettis, shown with Emma Goldman Clinic attorney Sam Jones, said a judge's decision to temporarily block Iowa's newly passed abortion law removes uncertainty as a legal challenge to the law proceeds. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

The U.S. Supreme Court rejected an appeal to an Arkansas law that would make it illegal to have a medication-induced abortion. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Supreme Court Leaves In Place Law That Effectively Bans Abortion By Pill — For Now

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Under rules outlined in a newly unveiled Trump administration proposal, crisis pregnancy centers and other organizations that do not provide standard contraceptive options, like birth control pills or IUDs, could find it easier to apply for Title X funds. Peter Dazeley/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Dazeley/Getty Images

Under Trump, Family Planning Funds Could Go To Groups That Oppose Contraception

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Planned Parenthood's affiliated clinics, like this one in Chicago, provide wellness exams and comprehensive contraceptive services, as well as screenings for cancer and sexually transmitted diseases for both women and men. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

President Trump shakes hands with Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar after he is sworn in by Vice President Pence on Jan. 29. Major reproductive health organizations are voicing concerns about the Trump administration's new approach to federal family-planning grants, which may reduce the role of Planned Parenthood and place greater emphasis on "natural family planning." Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Cecile Richards attends the 2017 Glamour Women of the Year Awards at Kings Theatre on Monday, Nov. 13, 2017, in New York. Evan Agostini/Invision/AP hide caption

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Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

Noemi Padilla, 47, recently left Tampa Women's Health, an independent clinic in Tampa, Fla. She worked there as a surgical nurse and assisted on abortion procedures up to about 23 weeks gestation. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

The Anti-Abortion Group That's Urging Clinic Workers to Quit Their Jobs

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