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Margaret Sanger appears before a Senate committee for federal birth-control legislation in Washington, D.C., on March 1, 1934, arguing that federal courts be given the right to discuss contraceptive methods with their patients. Anonymous/AP hide caption

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Anonymous/AP

Republican presidential candidates (from left) Donald Trump, Jeb Bush, Mike Huckabee, Ted Cruz and Rand Paul during the Republican presidential debate in Cleveland on Aug.6. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

When health care providers have the latest information on various birth control methods, research suggests, more of their patients who use birth control choose a long-acting reversible method, like the IUD. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

The Supreme Court declined to intervene in a case involving Medicaid payments to Planned Parenthood. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Radiologist Gerald Iba checks mammograms at The Elizabeth Center for Cancer Detection in Los Angeles in May 2010. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

An estimated 45,000 people took part in the Susan B. Komen Race for the Cure in Little Rock, Ark., in Oct. 2010. But after a controversy involving potential cuts to funding of Planned Parenthood earlier this year, participation in fundraising races has dropped. Brian Chilson/AP hide caption

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Brian Chilson/AP

Planned Parenthood Still In Cross Hairs

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