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Saudi Arabia's King Salman and Russian President Vladimir Putin pose for a photo during a welcoming ceremony at the Kremlin in October 2017. Last year, Saudi Arabia and Russia were the world's second- and third-largest oil producers, respectively. Alexei Nikolsky/AP hide caption

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Alexei Nikolsky/AP

President Trump signs one of five executive orders related to the oil pipeline industry. Trump has been busy for more than two weeks rolling back President Barack Obama's environmental legacy. Shawn Thew/Getty Images hide caption

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Shawn Thew/Getty Images

'America First' Energy Plan Challenges Free Market Realities

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Jesse Murillo (top right) and Megan Newman (bottom) opened the Out West RV park, nestled between Midland and Odessa, as a long-term investment. Since opening the park, the couple have been living in an RV as they build their own home. Ilana Panich-Linsman for NPR hide caption

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Ilana Panich-Linsman for NPR

Texas Town's Fortunes Rise And Fall With Pump Jacks And Oil Prices

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A motorcyclist waits Feb. 17 to buy gas in Caracas, Venezuela. President Nicolas Maduro increased the price of gasoline for the first time in 20 years, as he faced growing pressure to ease an economic crisis in the oil-producing country. Juan Barreto/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Juan Barreto/AFP/Getty Images

Cheap Oil Usually Means Global Growth, But This Time Seems Different

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Consumers have been benefiting from lower gas prices. Here, prices dip below $2 per gallon at an Exxon station in Woodbridge, Va., on Jan. 5. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Why Cheap Gas Might Not Be Good For The U.S. Economy

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Rob Oberg delivers oil to a home in south central Vermont. He works for Keyser Energy in Proctor, Vt., which provides heating fuel to about 5,000 customers. Nina Keck/Vermont Public Radio hide caption

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Nina Keck/Vermont Public Radio

Homeowners Who Played The Odds On Oil Heating Costs Lose Out

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The Tesoro Refinery at Nikiski in Kenai, Alaska, in 2008. Farah Nosh/Getty Images hide caption

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Farah Nosh/Getty Images

Alaska Faces Budget Deficit As Crude Oil Prices Slide

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A Saudi man walks past a pump at a petrol station Monday in the Red Sea city of Jeddah. Saudi Arabia said it plans to reduce subsidies on power, water and fuel as part of new measures introduced in the face of low oil prices. Amer Hilabi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Amer Hilabi/AFP/Getty Images

Higher Gas Prices, Long Lines: What Cheap Oil Means For Saudi Arabia

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Ryan Peck repossesses vehicles in Corpus Christi, Texas. His business is seeing the upside of the downturn in oil prices: a spike in the number of expensive trucks bought by oilfield workers during an earlier boom. Mose Buchele/KUT hide caption

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Mose Buchele/KUT

Oil Market Bust Yields Unexpected Boom For Texas Repo Men

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Falling oil prices have put downward pressure on gasoline prices, now averaging $2.65 a gallon — about 85 cents cheaper than a year ago. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

Oil Prices Tumble Again, Hurting Drillers But Helping Drivers

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Stacked rigs are seen along with other idled oil drilling equipment at a depot in Dickinson, N.D., last month. The International Energy Agency forecasts a continued drop in oil prices amid overproduction and falling global demand. Andrew Cullen/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Andrew Cullen/Reuters/Landov

Pump jacks and wells work in an oil field on the Monterey Shale formation in California. Economist Michael Porter says that hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is a "game changer" for the U.S. economy. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

America's Next Economic Boom Could Be Lying Underground

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Oil pump jacks in Williston, N.D., in December. Oil prices have been on the rise, but some analysts say the global economic slowdown, fracking and the rise of alternative energy will mean less demand and lower prices. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Oil Prices Are Rising Again, But Will They Keep Going Up?

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Students at the Pennsylvania College of Technology are learning a technique called "tripping pipe," moving a pipe from a stack into a horizontal position and lowering it down into a well. The students train on a practice drilling rig to learn how to be roustabouts. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

In Pennsylvania, Employment Booms Amid Oil And Natural Gas Bust

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