EPA EPA
Stories About

EPA

Morning traffic fills the SR2 freeway in Los Angeles, California. The EPA released new rules for vehicle emissions that are expected to cut tailpipe pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, which are fueling climate change. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David McNew/Getty Images

In a boost for EVs, EPA finalizes strict new limits on tailpipe emissions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1239092833/1239767599" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear a challenge from GOP-led states and industry groups seeking to block the EPA's "good neighbor" provision, which is designed to reduce smog and air pollution. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Catie Dull/NPR

A flare burns natural gas at an oil well on Aug. 26, 2021, in Watford City, N.D. Oil and natural gas companies would have to pay a fee for methane emissions that exceed certain levels under a new rule proposed by the Biden administration. Matthew Brown/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Matthew Brown/AP

Emissions from a coal-fired power plant are silhouetted against the setting sun in Kansas City, Mo., on Feb. 1, 2021. The Environmental Protection Agency is tightening rules that limit emissions of mercury and other harmful pollutants from coal-fired power plants, updating standards imposed more than a decade ago. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Charlie Riedel/AP

Trucks line up to enter a Port of Oakland shipping terminal on Nov. 10, 2021, in Oakland, Calif. President Joe Biden's administration cleared the way for California's plan to phase out a wide range of diesel-powered trucks, a part of the state's efforts to drastically cut planet-warming emissions and improve air quality in heavy-traffic areas. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Noah Berger/AP

Michael Regan, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency, at an event in 2021. The Biden administration is announcing a plan to regulate "forever chemicals" in drinking water. Travis Long/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Travis Long/AP

Ron Fodo, Ohio EPA Emergency Response, looks for signs of fish and also agitates the water in Leslie Run creek to check for chemicals that have settled at the bottom following a train derailment that is causing environmental concerns on February 20, 2023 in East Palestine, Ohio. Michael Swensen/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Swensen/Getty Images

A great egret flies above a great blue heron in a wetland inside the Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge in Trenton, Mich., on Oct. 7. The Biden administration has announced a finalized rule for federal protection of hundreds of thousands of small streams, wetlands and other waterways. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Carlos Osorio/AP

EPA Administrator Michael Regan stands near the Marathon Petroleum Refinery in Reserve, La., on Nov. 16, 2021. The Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday awarded grants for projects to monitor air quality in 37 states. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gerald Herbert/AP

Environmental Protection Agency administrator Michael Regan speaks at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, in Greensboro, N.C., on April 14. The EPA is warning that two nonstick and stain-resistant compounds in drinking water pose health risks at levels below the government's ability to detect them. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Carolyn Kaster/AP

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Michael Regan is reflected in an electronic vehicle as it charges as he speaks during an event to announce a final rule for federal greenhouse gas emissions standards for cars and trucks on Monday. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Farmers have been spraying chlorpyrifos on crops, including strawberries, apples, citrus, broccoli, and corn since 1965. MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle vi/MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle vi/MediaNews Group via Getty Images

Michael Regan speaks during his confirmation hearing in February to be the Environmental Protection Agency administrator. In an NPR interview Thursday, Regan says technology that helps eliminate emissions is key to tackling climate change. Caroline Brehman/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Caroline Brehman/AP

EPA Chief Says Biden Infrastructure Bill Will Help The U.S. Face Climate Change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/985253393/985253394" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Southwest Airlines flight takes off as United Airlines planes sit parked on a runway at Denver International Airport in April. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images

This smokestack, left over from a century of copper mining, spewed up to 24 tons of arsenic per day over an area the size of New York City. Nora Saks/Montana Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Nora Saks/Montana Public Radio

Montana Residents Ask Supreme Court To Allow Cleanup Beyond Superfund Requirements

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/784158873/784343541" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Coal ash swirls on the surface of the Dan River following one of the worst coal-ash spills in U.S. history into the river in Danville, Va., in February 2014. The Environmental Protection Agency wants to ease restrictions on coal ash and wastewater from coal plants. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gerry Broome/AP