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This smokestack, left over from a century of copper mining, spewed up to 24 tons of arsenic per day over an area the size of New York City. Nora Saks/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Nora Saks/Montana Public Radio

Montana Residents Ask Supreme Court To Allow Cleanup Beyond Superfund Requirements

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Coal ash swirls on the surface of the Dan River following one of the worst coal-ash spills in U.S. history into the river in Danville, Va., in February 2014. The Environmental Protection Agency wants to ease restrictions on coal ash and wastewater from coal plants. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP

Environmental Protection Agency administrator Andrew Wheeler speaks during a television interview in front of the West Wing of the White House, on Sept. 19, 2019. Wheeler has threatened to withdraw billions of dollars in federal highway money unless California clears a backlog of air pollution control plans. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Bill Wehrum, the Environmental Protection Agencys top air policy official, said he is stepping down at the end of June. Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Andrew Wheeler arrives Wednesday to testify at a Senate Environment and Public Works Committee hearing to be the administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Acting EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler said the Trump Administration plans to tackle the issue of of lead exposure "head on." Wheeler seen here during a Senate Committee hearing in August. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Scott Pruitt attends a picnic for military families at the White House on July 4, a day before he was forced out of as head of the Environmental Protection Agency for various alleged ethical lapses. Brendan Smialowski /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski /AFP/Getty Images

A fire at the Husky Oil Refinery on April 26, in Superior, Wis. The Environmental Protection Agency is planning to rescind regulations that would require refineries and chemical manufacturers to disclose information about emergency plans and the root causes of disasters. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt speaks at the Faith and Freedom conference in Washington, DC, on June. Pruitt is facing multiple ethics scandals from his actions since taking over the agency. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

As The Scandals Mount, Conservatives Turn On Scott Pruitt

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Scott Pruitt speaks on election night 2010, after his successful campaign for Oklahoma attorney general. When Pruitt assumed office, he also took control of the state's case against the poultry industry. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

In Oklahoma, Critics Say Pruitt Stalled Pollution Case After Taking Industry Funds

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Vehicles pass during the afternoon commute on Highway 101 in Los Angeles on April 2. California is suing the EPA over a plan to revise fuel efficiency standards for vehicles, weakening Obama-era limits on greenhouse gas emissions. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

The U.S. Senate narrowly confirmed Scott Pruitt as administrator of the EPA in 2017. It was the latest step in a political career that has focused in large part on faith-based issues. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

'On Fire For God's Work': How Scott Pruitt's Faith Drives His Politics

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