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Shara and Robert Watkins hold their 5-month-old daughter, Kaiya, in their home in San Mateo, Calif., just after she had woken up from an afternoon nap. Lindsey Moore/KQED hide caption

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Lindsey Moore/KQED

Prenatal Testing Can Ease Minds Or Heighten Anxieties

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Their research is still in early stages, but Kristin Myers (left), a mechanical engineer, and Dr. Joy Vink, an OB-GYN, both at Columbia University, have already learned that cervical tissue is a more complicated mix of material than doctors ever realized. Adrienne Grunwald for NPR hide caption

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Adrienne Grunwald for NPR

Scientific Duo Gets Back To Basics To Make Childbirth Safer

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New recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force call for doctors to identify patients at risk of depression during pregnancy or after childbirth and refer them to counseling. Adene Sanchez/Getty Images hide caption

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Adene Sanchez/Getty Images

To Prevent Pregnancy-Related Depression, At-Risk Women Advised To Get Counseling

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Chronic pain is just one health concern women can struggle with after giving birth. Some who have complicated pregnancies or deliveries can experience long-lasting effects to their physical and mental health, researchers find. Mirko Pradelli/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Mirko Pradelli/EyeEm/Getty Images

Lisa Abramson holds her firstborn child, Lucy, in 2014. A few weeks after Lucy's birth, Abramson began feeling confused and then started developing delusions — symptoms of postpartum psychosis. Courtesy of Claire Mulkey hide caption

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Courtesy of Claire Mulkey

She Wanted To Be The Perfect Mom, Then Landed In A Psychiatric Unit

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Dr. Lisa Hofler runs a University of New Mexico clinic that stocks mifepristone but doesn't routinely provide prenatal care. She and her colleagues can schedule same-day appointments for women diagnosed with miscarriages elsewhere. Adria Malcolm for NPR hide caption

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Adria Malcolm for NPR

Federal Legislation Seeks Ban On Shackling Of Pregnant Inmates

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Kristen Philman first tried methamphetamine in her early 20s, as an alternative to heroin and other opioids. When she discovered she was pregnant, she says, it was a wake-up call, and she did what she needed to do to stop using all those drugs. Theo Stroomer for NPR hide caption

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Theo Stroomer for NPR

Another Drug Crisis: Methamphetamine Use By Pregnant Women

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Four-year-old Violet (right) supervises as her mom Margaret Siebers pours a first-ever spoonful of honey for 1-year-old Frances to try. Siebers spent much of the end of her pregnancy with Frances confined to bed rest at her home in Milwaukee. Sara Stathas for NPR hide caption

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Sara Stathas for NPR

Rethinking Bed Rest For Pregnancy

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Becky Shaw's first pregnancy ended in a miscarriage in 2014. The following year, she and her husband, Ben, had Parker, their "rainbow baby," as babies born after pregnancy loss are often called. Ruby Eliason Photography hide caption

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Ruby Eliason Photography

For older mothers, it can feel like there's little time to waste before trying for another child. But there are real risks linked to getting pregnant again too soon. Lauren Bates/Getty Images hide caption

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Lauren Bates/Getty Images

Inducing labor at 39 weeks may involve IV medications and continuous fetal monitoring. But if the pregnancy is otherwise uncomplicated, mother and baby can do just fine, the latest evidence suggests. Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images

Pregnancy Debate Revisited: To Induce Labor, Or Not?

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A vaccine given during pregnancy protects the baby against whooping cough, but only about 50 percent of pregnant women get it. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Xu for NPR

Pregnant Women: Avoid Soft Cheeses, But Do Get These Shots

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Kelly Zimmerman holds her son Jaxton Wright at a parenting session at the Children's Health Center in Reading, Pa. The free program provides resources and social support to new parents in recovery from addiction, or who are otherwise vulnerable. Natalie Piserchio for NPR hide caption

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Natalie Piserchio for NPR

Beyond Opioids: How A Family Came Together To Stay Together

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New Book Explores The Science Of Pregnancy 'Like A Mother'

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James Harrison, known as "the man with the golden arm," is pictured in 2003, when he was recognized for the number of times he had donated blood products. At the time it was his 808th donation. The Australian man has now donated well over 1,000 times. David Gray/Reuters hide caption

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David Gray/Reuters

When Jenna Sauter's youngest son, Axel, tested positive for THC — marijuana's active ingredient — after he was born, she got a home visit from local social services. Sauter says she and her friends don't smoke near their children. Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News

Is Smoking Pot While Pregnant Safe For The Baby?

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Nicole and Ben Veum and baby Adrian, who was born after Nicole had to be evacuated from a hospital because of a fire that swept through Santa Rosa, Calif. April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

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April Dembosky/KQED

Giving Birth Is Hard Enough — Now Try It In The Middle Of A Wildfire

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Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, center, and ranking member Ron Wyden, D-Ore., have a plan to renew funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program, which lapsed Sept. 30. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP