pregnancy pregnancy

In the technique known as intracytoplasmic sperm injection, a fertility specialist uses a tiny needle to inject sperm into an egg cell. Mauro Fermariello/Science Source hide caption

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Mauro Fermariello/Science Source

There's a widely held assumption that a slight imbalance in male births has its start at the very moment of conception. But researchers say factors later in pregnancy are more likely to explain the phenomenon. CNRI/Science Source hide caption

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CNRI/Science Source

Why Are More Baby Boys Born Than Girls?

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A mother feeds her new baby at the Yida refugee camp in South Sudan, which has the highest maternal mortality rate in the world. About 1 in 7 women in South Sudan die from causes related to pregnancy. Paula Bronstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

States Fund Pregnancy Centers That Discourage Abortion

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Mary Harris was relieved when Stella was born with a mop of thick black hair, as if she had been protected from the chemo somehow. Courtesy of Howard Harris hide caption

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Courtesy of Howard Harris

Pregnant With Cancer: One Woman's Journey

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Ultrasound is often used for prenatal screening. It's just one of several prenatal screenings available to pregnant women. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

DNA Blood Test Gives Women A New Option For Prenatal Screening

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A woman enters the Ebola treatment center at the Island Hospital outside of Monrovia, Liberia, Oct. 6. She said she was bleeding heavily from a miscarriage and was turned away from other clinics in the city. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Dangerous Deliveries: Ebola Leaves Moms And Babies Without Care

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A healthy baby still tops women's wishes for their future children, but intelligence and athletic skill are gaining importance. Claire Fraser/ImageZoo/Corbis hide caption

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Claire Fraser/ImageZoo/Corbis