Muslim radicalization Muslim radicalization
Stories About

Muslim radicalization

A group of young Muslim friends in Washington, D.C., meets occasionally to support each other in their work and discuss the struggles their community faces. Brandon Chew/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Brandon Chew/NPR

This Is Our Islam: To Be Young, Devout And Muslim In America Today

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/469521886/469897748" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In the video "Does Islam Encourage Violence?" Imam Omar Atia (left) and Zac Parsons discuss modern perceptions of Islam. Screenshot/Reclamation Studios via Youtube hide caption

toggle caption
Screenshot/Reclamation Studios via Youtube

Moderate Muslims Counter ISIS Propaganda With Their Own Media Strategy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/424961326/426674397" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lamya Kaddor teaches Islamic studies in Germany. She's written a new book, Zum Toeten Bereit (Ready To Kill), about the experience of having five former students flee to Syria to join jihadist groups. Andre Zelck/Courtesy of Piper Verlag GmbH hide caption

toggle caption
Andre Zelck/Courtesy of Piper Verlag GmbH

After Students Went To Wage Jihad, Teacher Highlights Youth Radicalization

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/394500965/394517459" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Somali-American youths play basketball before the start of a September 2013 solidarity rally by the Minneapolis Somali community to denounce al-Shabab's attack of a shopping mall in Nairobi, Kenya. Less than a decade after groups of teens from Minneapolis emigrated to Somalia to join the terrorist group, more have been recruited to join the self-declared Islamic State in Syria. Eric Miller/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Miller/Reuters/Landov

For Somalis In Minneapolis, Jihadi Recruiting Is A Recurring Nightmare

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/387302748/387302749" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Cherif Kouachi, one of the brothers responsible for the Charlie Hebdo attacks, spent 20 months in Fleury-Merogis prison just outside Paris, where he crossed paths with a radical imam with ties to Osama bin Laden.This photo shows the men's building in May 2014. Charles Platiau/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Charles Platiau/Reuters/Landov

French Prisons Prove To Be Effective Incubators For Islamic Extremism

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/379081047/379157270" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

ISIS Used Predatory Tools And Tactics To Convince U.S. Teens To Join

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/370022514/370022515" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Alfons R. of Hamburg, Germany (shown in this undated photo), converted to Islam at age 17. Later, he went to Turkey, then Syria, to join ISIS. He was killed this past summer. Courtesy of Manfred Karg hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Manfred Karg

From German Teen To ISIS Jihadist: A Father's Struggle To Understand

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/368049116/368282939" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ahmed Ismail, a soccer coach, runs the West Bank Athletic Club in Minneapolis. His players practice near a large Somali community where young people have been recruited to fight in overseas conflicts. Craig Lassig/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Craig Lassig/AP