Ghana Ghana

After Sulley Muntari (right) heard racial slurs from fans during a match in Sardinia, Italy, on April 30, he protested — and got a yellow card from the referee. A supporter holds the card aloft. Enrico Locci/Getty Images hide caption

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Enrico Locci/Getty Images

Judith Ausah (left) and Evelyn Sewodey create solar panels at the Lady Volta Vocational Center for Electricity and Solar Power in Ghana. "At first, I thought it was man's work," says Ausah, whose 2-month-old daughter stays in the school nursery. "But I came here and saw that, yes, women can do it." Ginanne Brownell/For NPR hide caption

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Ginanne Brownell/For NPR

Looking out at the Atlantic Ocean from Elmina Castle, I felt the pull of different forebears. Courtesy of Kainaz Amaria hide caption

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Courtesy of Kainaz Amaria

Finding A Way Home Through 'The Door Of No Return'

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Grains, beads and bangles unearthed from dig sites in Banda, Ghana, tell of a time when droughts did not bring famine. (Above) Archaeologists Amanda Logan and Osei Kofi dig into the floor of a house from the 1500s. Courtesy of Ann Stahl/Northwestern University hide caption

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Courtesy of Ann Stahl/Northwestern University

Kodjo, who's 4, was born with a cleft and doomed to be drowned — until Dr. Solomon Obiri-Yeboah, in the blue shirt, performed surgery to correct the birth defect. Also in the photo: Kodjo's guardian (in the bright patterned shirt) and Nkeiruka Obi, West African regional director of Smile Train. Courtesy of Smile Train hide caption

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Courtesy of Smile Train

The characters of An African City (from left): Zainab, Ngozi, Nana Yaa, Sade and Makena. Emmanuel Bobbie/An African City Ltd. hide caption

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Emmanuel Bobbie/An African City Ltd.

Sex And 'An African City': A Steamy Ghanaian Show You Don't Want To Miss

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Emmanuel Kwame, 60, lost his sight to river blindness as a young man. He lives in Asubende, Ghana, earning a living as a farmer and fisherman. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

The Farmer And Fisherman Who Lost His Sight To River Blindness

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Albert Tamanja Bidim, a community volunteer, distributes ivermectin, the tablet that fights river blindness, in the Ghanaian town of Beposo 2. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

What A Difference A Drug Makes In The Fight Against River Blindness

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Ade, played by Nana Sam Elliott-Sackeyfio glows in new love at a private dinner, in the production of Bananas and Groundnuts. Courtesy of Roverman Productions hide caption

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Courtesy of Roverman Productions

Years After Its Curfew Killed Theater, Ghana Gets A Second Act

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