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Chronic pain is just one health concern women can struggle with after giving birth. Some who have complicated pregnancies or deliveries can experience long-lasting effects to their physical and mental health, researchers find. Mirko Pradelli/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Mirko Pradelli/EyeEm/Getty Images

Angela Lautner, who lives in Elsmere, Ky., has Type 1 diabetes and is an advocate for affordable insulin. Maddie McGarvey for NPR hide caption

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Maddie McGarvey for NPR

'We're Fighting For Our Lives': Patients Protest Sky-High Insulin Prices

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The sweetened beverage industry has spent millions to combat soda taxes and support medical groups that avoid blaming sugary drinks for health problems. Melissa Lomax Speelman/Getty Images hide caption

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Melissa Lomax Speelman/Getty Images

"It shouldn't have happened," says Nicole Smith-Holt of Richfield, Minn., gazing at the death certificate of her son Alec Raeshawn Smith. Bram Sable-Smith for NPR hide caption

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Bram Sable-Smith for NPR

Insulin's High Cost Leads To Lethal Rationing

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Metformin pills — they're a go-to drug for type 2 diabetics — move through a sorting machine at a pharmaceutical plant in India. Sara Hylton/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Sara Hylton/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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Major Medical Associations Feud Over Diabetes Guidelines

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Patients with Type-1 diabetes don't have enough healthy islets of Langerhans cells — hormone-secreting cells of the pancreas. Granules inside these cells release insulin and other substances into the blood. Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source

A Quest: Insulin-Releasing Implant For Type-1 Diabetes

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Hundreds of people took part in Washington, D.C.'s "Grocery Walk" to demonstrate the difficulty of getting fresh food in some areas. Brian Oh /Courtesy of DC Greens hide caption

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Brian Oh /Courtesy of DC Greens

Screening for Type 2 diabetes involves a blood test, and if results are concerning a second test is recommended. ERproductions Ltd/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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ERproductions Ltd/Blend Images/Getty Images

Pricking your fingers may someday be a thing of the past for diabetics as new technologies aim to make blood sugar regulation more convenient. Alden Chadwick/Getty Images hide caption

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Alden Chadwick/Getty Images

Roughly 80 percent of all first strokes arise from risks that people can influence with behavioral changes, doctors say — risks like high blood pressure, smoking and drug abuse. Brenda Muller/Gallo Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Brenda Muller/Gallo Images/Getty Images

William Scott (right) and his wife, Teresa, arrived at DaVita Med Center Dialysis in Houston on Tuesday morning, after missing William's appointment on Monday. "It's just good he got in here," she says. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

'This Is Surreal': Houston Dialysis Center Struggles To Treat Patients

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Michael McBrayer tests his blood sugar before eating lunch. He gets supplies he needs to manage diabetes for free as part of a deal between his employer and health insurer. Evan Frost/MPR News hide caption

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Evan Frost/MPR News

Health Insurers Try Paying More Up Front To Pay Less Later

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Ann Mazuca has diabetes and glaucoma that can be aggravated by high blood pressure. The support shown by clinic staff at the University Family Health Center Southeast, in San Antonio, helps her do what's needed to reduce hypertension, she says. "The fact that they care makes me care." Wendy Rigby/TPR hide caption

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Wendy Rigby/TPR

A chile-rubbed pork taco is topped with french fries in the Merced market in Mexico City. The taco costs 10 pesos — less than 50 cents. Cheap, high-calorie food is contributing to Mexico's obesity problem. Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR hide caption

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Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR

Pork Tacos Topped With Fries: Fuel For Mexico's Diabetes Epidemic

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Dr. Tonatiuh Barrientos Gutierrez, an epidemiologist in Mexico City, jogs near his home in the southern part of the capital. He says it's hard to run on the city's streets. Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR hide caption

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Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR

In Diabetes Fight, Lifestyle Changes Prove Hard To Come By In Mexico

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A family sells pastries in Mexico City. As Mexicans' wages have risen, their average daily intake of calories has soared. Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR hide caption

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Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR

How Diabetes Got To Be The No. 1 Killer In Mexico

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By combining results of common blood tests, the researchers were able to come up with a way to predict risk of diabetes and other chronic diseases. Martynasfoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Martynasfoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto