energy energy

Miller Farm, the terminus of Van Syckel's pipeline, in 1868. The oil was pumped to Miller Farm and then transported by railroad. Drake Well Museum/Courtesy of PHMC hide caption

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Drake Well Museum/Courtesy of PHMC

Even Pickaxes Couldn't Stop The Nation's First Oil Pipeline

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An oil well in Garden City, Texas. With prices plunging, oil companies are laying off thousands of workers. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

As Oil Prices Tank, Firms Large And Small Feel The Pain

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A functioning oil rig sits in front of the capital building in Oklahoma City, Okla. The oil industry is an important employer in the state, but officials are concerned a technique used to dispose of wastewater from oil extraction is behind a surge in earthquakes here. Frank Morris/KCUR hide caption

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Frank Morris/KCUR

With Quakes Spiking, Oil Industry Is Under The Microscope In Oklahoma

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Elizabeth Ebinger in Maplewood, N.J., bought her solar panels, while neighbor Tim Roebuck signed a 20-year lease. Both are happy with the approach they took, and both are saving money on energy bills. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

The Great Solar Panel Debate: To Lease Or To Buy?

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Tracy Perryman is production manager for his family's small oil company in Luling, Texas. B.J.P. Inc. owns 116 wells that, combined, produce about 100 barrels a day. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Planning Through Oil Booms Helps Small Producers Weather The Busts

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Susan and Bill Dunavan own 80 acres of land in York County. Melissa Block/NPR hide caption

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Melissa Block/NPR

Listen To Part 1

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Casa Dominique is an ecolodge on Lanzarote's northern coast. Julie Genicot, a French trekking guide, has lived in Lanzarote since her grandparents opened the Casa Dominique when she was a child. She worries that offshore oil drilling might ruin the natural environment she grew up in. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

Sun, Sand And Offshore Drilling In Spain's Famed Canary Islands

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Pipes for TransCanada's planned Keystone XL pipeline are stored in Gascoyne, N.D. The U.S. House has voted to approve the proposed project, which would allow crude oil to flow from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico. The Senate plans to vote Tuesday on legislation that would greenlight the project. Andrew Cullen/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Andrew Cullen/Reuters/Landov

What You Need To Know About The Keystone XL Oil Pipeline

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Ray Gerrish repairs a drilling rig near Watford City, N.D. Oil industry analysts predict that oil prices will have to remain low for at least several months before having a significant effect on U.S. production. Jim Gehrz/MCT/Landov hide caption

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Jim Gehrz/MCT/Landov

It's Still Too Early For Tanking Oil Prices To Curb U.S. Drilling

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Pumpjacks at the Inglewood oil fields in California in March. Some of the most controversial methods of oil extraction, like fracking, oil sands production and Arctic drilling, are also expensive. That's made them less profitable as the price of oil continues to fall. Richard Vogel/AP hide caption

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Richard Vogel/AP

Falling Oil Prices Make Fracking Less Lucrative

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Lynn Good has had many mentors throughout her career — but few of them were women. "So I'm generationally on the early part of the ascent of women into leadership roles," the Duke Energy president and CEO says. Pat Sullivan/AP hide caption

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Pat Sullivan/AP

Duke Energy CEO: 'I Don't Think Of Myself As A Powerful Woman'

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A fireball goes up at the site of an oil train derailment in Casselton, N.D., in this Dec. 30 photo. The fiery crash left an ominous cloud over the town and led some residents to evacuate. Bruce Crummy/AP hide caption

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Bruce Crummy/AP

Fiery Oil-Train Derailments Prompt Calls For Less Flammable Oil

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A woman in Senegal charges her cellphone using a port in her solar-powered LED lantern. Bruno Déméocq/Courtesy of Lighting Africa hide caption

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Bruno Déméocq/Courtesy of Lighting Africa

In Del Norte, Colo., Public Works Supervisor Kevin Larimore shows off solar panels that provide electricity for the town's water supply. Despite generating its own solar energy, the town is still at risk of a blackout if its main power line goes down. Dan Boyce/Inside Energy hide caption

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Dan Boyce/Inside Energy

When The Power's Out, Solar Panels May Not Keep The Lights On

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