earth earth
Stories About

earth

TravelCouples/Getty Images
Credits: NASA/Goddard/SDO

How Venus got caught up in an 18th century space race

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198908560/1211846028" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Core released to audiences 20 years ago. Ever since, audiences have bemoaned, laughed at and loved the loose use of geological science in the film. PictureLux/The Hollywood Archive/Alamy hide caption

toggle caption
PictureLux/The Hollywood Archive/Alamy

What scientists love and lament when Hollywood journeys to Earth's core

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1171384933/1200392702" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Some of the constellations that are visible from the Northern Hemisphere at different times of the year. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/JPL-Caltech

Think you're a Taurus? Earth's wobble sees things differently

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1173786157/1173808350" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

This computer-generated 3D model of Venus' surface shows the summit of Maat Mons, the volcano that is exhibiting signs of activity. A new study found one of Maat Mons' vents became enlarged and changed shape over an eight-month period in 1991, indicating an eruptive event occurred. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/JPL-Caltech

Venus and Earth: A tale of two 'twins'

Planetary scientists announced some big news this week about our next-door neighbor, Venus. For the first time, they had found direct evidence that Venus has active, ongoing volcanic activity.

Venus and Earth: A tale of two 'twins'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1164376096/1200392917" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

As more robots and people travel to the moon in coming years, some researchers believe it's time to set a lunar time standard. NASA Johnson hide caption

toggle caption
NASA Johnson

If daylight saving time seems tricky, try figuring out the time on the moon

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1162351563/1162917428" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Stanford University/Getty Images

Zircon: The Keeper Of Earth's Time

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1147830707/1200393172" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In this composite image provided by NASA, the SDO satellite captures the path sequence of the transit of Venus across the face of the sun on June 5-6, 2012 as seen from space. The next pair of events will not happen again until the year 2117 and 2125. NASA/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/Getty Images

Venus And The 18th Century Space Race

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1112079811/1200393853" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

NASA's Perseverance rover took this "selfie" next to a rock where it drilled for samples. NASA wants to bring samples collected by this rover back to Earth. NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

NASA is bringing rocks back from Mars, but what if those samples contain alien life?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1095645081/1096545858" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This illustration shows NASA's DART spacecraft and the Italian Space Agency's (ASI) LICIACube prior to impact at the Didymos binary system. NASA/Johns Hopkins, APL/Steve Gribben hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/Johns Hopkins, APL/Steve Gribben

A Mission To Redirect An Asteroid

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1057260263/1200394647" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Pacific Ocean from space. In both liquid and frozen form, water covers most of the Earth's surface, and there's been a debate among scientists about where all the water originated. Stocktrek Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Stocktrek Images/Getty Images

Water, Water, Every Where — And Now Scientists Know Where It Came From

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/906654225/906835773" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission, shown in an artist's rendering, will measure tiny fluctuations in Earth's gravitational field to show how water moves around the planet. NASA/JPL hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/JPL

NASA Launching New Satellites To Measure Earth's Lumpy Gravity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/612980506/613117673" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The planet, known as Kepler-452b, was believed to be about 60 percent larger than our planet and within the habitable zone of its star. NASA Ames/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle hide caption

toggle caption
NASA Ames/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle

Earth's 'Bigger, Older Cousin' Maybe Doesn't Even Exist

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/609840337/610529536" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript