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Starbucks is closing more than 8,000 U.S. stores on the afternoon of May 29 to conduct racial-bias training. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Starbucks Training Focuses On The Evolving Study Of Unconscious Bias

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The lunch and helmet of a Venezuelan iron worker lie on a table during lunch break, in Ciudad Piar, Bolívar state, Venezuela. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Rodrigo Abd/AP

Many Venezuelan Workers Are Leaving The Job, And The Country

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Nina Irizarry says she was sexually harassed in various jobs as a contractor but didn't have a human resources person to turn to or an employer to sue. Justin T. Shockley/Courtesy of Nina Irizarry hide caption

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Justin T. Shockley/Courtesy of Nina Irizarry

Unequal Rights: Contract Workers Have Few Workplace Protections

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According to a recent NPR/Marist poll, 30 percent of Americans do something else for pay in addition to their full-time jobs. Ilana Kohn/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Ilana Kohn/Ikon Images/Getty Images

When A Full-Time Job Isn't Enough To Make It

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Demonstrators including French trade union leader Philippe Martinez, center, protest against President Emmanuel Macron's fast-tracked labor law reforms on Sept. 12 in Paris. Christophe Morin/IP3/Getty Images hide caption

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Christophe Morin/IP3/Getty Images

Alex Belfiori, 28, is a contract worker at Dick's Sporting Goods near Pittsburgh. An NPR/Marist poll shows 65 percent of contract workers are men and 62 percent of such workers are under 45. Lynn Johnson for NPR hide caption

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Lynn Johnson for NPR

The Mystery Of Contract Work: Why So Many Guys?

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Images from Mike Tannenbaum; Lindsay Hodgson; Brenden Gunnell

Voices Of America's Contract Workers: 'I Love The Freedom'

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John Vensel is a contract attorney at the Orrick law firm in Wheeling, W.Va. He says contract work is today's economic reality. Yuki Noguchi/NPR hide caption

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Yuki Noguchi/NPR

Freelanced: The Rise Of The Contract Workforce

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Seema Verma, administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, at a White House press conference in May. More people moving off Medicaid, she says, would be a good outcome. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

New Rules May Make Getting And Staying On Medicaid More Difficult

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Job seekers chat during an employment event in Dallas last month. Under the new administration, Republicans are starting to see the economy through rose-colored glasses. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

Is The Economic Glass Half-Full Or Half-Empty? It Depends

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Older adults have been excluded from some websites that post jobs, according to Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan. Jonathan McHugh/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Jonathan McHugh/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Older Workers Find Age Discrimination Built Right Into Some Job Websites

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Lorenzo Gritti for NPR

Poverty Wages For U.S. Child Care Workers May Be Behind High Turnover

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A man speaks with a potential employer Sept. 13 at a job fair in Hartford, Conn. Recent wage gains reflect the steady healing of the labor market since the worst of the Great Recession. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

An employee moves cement blocks at the Cement Products Manufacturing Co. facility in Redmond, Ore. Millions of men in their prime working years have dropped out of the labor force since the 1960s. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

An Economic Mystery: Why Are Men Leaving The Workforce?

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Software coders (from left) William Stevens, Michael Harrison and Brack Quillen work at the Bit Source office in Pikeville, Ky., in February. The year-old firm has trained laid-off coal workers to become software coders. Sam Owens/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Owens/Bloomberg via Getty Images

From Coal To Code: A New Path For Laid-Off Miners In Kentucky

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Samsung is the largest employer and premier place to work in South Korea. Jung Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jung Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images

To The List Of High-Stakes Tests In Korea, Add The Samsung SAT

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Economists use the phrase "full employment" to mean the number of people seeking jobs is roughly in balance with the number of openings. heshphoto/Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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heshphoto/Getty Images/Image Source

Why Some Still Can't Find Jobs As The Economy Nears 'Full Employment'

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