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Gaby Gemetti decided to leave the workforce after having her second child. In March she started a "returnship," a new type of program to recruit and retrain women like her who are looking to resume their careers. Here, Gaby and John Gemetti are seen with their children, Carlo and Gianna. Courtesy of Shannon Wight Photography hide caption

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Courtesy of Shannon Wight Photography

Hot Job Market Is Wooing Women Into Workforce Faster Than Men

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With the economy humming, U.S. unemployment is at a nearly 50-year low. Shouldn't we be excited? Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

America Is In Full Employment, So Why Aren't We Celebrating?

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Plumber Zakiyyah Askia welds pipes at a high-rise residence under construction in Chicago on Jan. 24. U.S. employers added 196,000 jobs in March, a rebound from February's weak growth, the Labor Department said Friday. Teresa Crawford/AP hide caption

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Teresa Crawford/AP

Workers build bed frames at a factory in Commerce, Calif., near Los Angeles, in 2017. In January, the economy added a bigger-than-expected 304,000 jobs, including 13,000 in manufacturing. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Added 304,000 Jobs In January; Shutdown Boosted Unemployment To 4 Percent

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Worker Kelly Coman inspects an F-150 pickup on the assembly line at a Ford plant in Dearborn, Mich. Some indicators point to a slowdown in manufacturing, but the sector added 32,000 jobs in December. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

A worker installs a roof on a home being built in San Diego in 2017. The housing market has been softening, with sales of new single-family homes falling in October to the lowest level in more than 2 1/2 years. Mike Blake/Reuters hide caption

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Mike Blake/Reuters

Job seekers line up at a technology fair in Los Angeles in March. Employers added more jobs than analysts expected last month, as the jobless rate remained at a nearly 50-year low of 3.7 percent. Monica Almeida/Reuters hide caption

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Monica Almeida/Reuters

A worker installs a door on a 2018 Ford F-150 truck at an assembly plant in Dearborn, Mich., on Sept. 27. The U.S. unemployment rate fell to 3.7 percent in September, a nearly 50-year low. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

An employer in Indiana is piloting a program that offers a path to employment after failing a drug test. Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

Now Hiring: A Company Offers Drug Treatment And A Job To Addicted Applicants

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In Maine, a teenager serves ice cream at a Dairy Queen for the summer. But data show teens' participation in the labor force is on the decline, and it has been for decades. Jill Brady/Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Jill Brady/Press Herald via Getty Images

Arby's is among seven fast-food chains that have agreed to stop limiting their workers' ability to take jobs at other restaurants in the same chain. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Fast-Food Chains Back Away From Limits On Whom They Hire

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Last year, 10.1 percent of the workforce was independent contractors, down from 10.7 percent in 2005, according to a new survey by the Labor Department. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

1 In 10 Workers Is An Independent Contractor, Labor Department Says

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Starbucks is closing more than 8,000 U.S. stores on the afternoon of May 29 to conduct racial-bias training. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Starbucks Training Focuses On The Evolving Study Of Unconscious Bias

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The lunch and helmet of a Venezuelan iron worker lie on a table during lunch break, in Ciudad Piar, Bolívar state, Venezuela. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Rodrigo Abd/AP

Many Venezuelan Workers Are Leaving The Job, And The Country

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Nina Irizarry says she was sexually harassed in various jobs as a contractor but didn't have a human resources person to turn to or an employer to sue. Justin T. Shockley/Courtesy of Nina Irizarry hide caption

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Justin T. Shockley/Courtesy of Nina Irizarry

Unequal Rights: Contract Workers Have Few Workplace Protections

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According to a recent NPR/Marist poll, 30 percent of Americans do something else for pay in addition to their full-time jobs. Ilana Kohn/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Ilana Kohn/Ikon Images/Getty Images

When A Full-Time Job Isn't Enough To Make It

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Demonstrators including French trade union leader Philippe Martinez, center, protest against President Emmanuel Macron's fast-tracked labor law reforms on Sept. 12 in Paris. Christophe Morin/IP3/Getty Images hide caption

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Christophe Morin/IP3/Getty Images

Alex Belfiori, 28, is a contract worker at Dick's Sporting Goods near Pittsburgh. An NPR/Marist poll shows 65 percent of contract workers are men and 62 percent of such workers are under 45. Lynn Johnson for NPR hide caption

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Lynn Johnson for NPR

The Mystery Of Contract Work: Why So Many Guys?

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