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The Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant was scheduled to be shuttered in 2025. But California Governor Gavin Newsom now wants to expand its lifespan. Michael Macor/The San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Macor/The San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images

Gold medalist Lee Kiefer of the United States shows her medal and victory bouquet during the medal ceremony for the women's individual foil final competition on Sunday at the Summer Olympics. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

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Hassan Ammar/AP

Wildlife has moved into deserted towns in Fukushima prefecture, after people evacuated due to the nuclear accident a decade ago. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Cosmos Karaoke is a lively karaoke bar in the middle of Namie, a small city that is slowly reopening after the 2011 earthquake, tsunami and nuclear accident devastated the area. Minza Lee (right) is the driving force behind the bar. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

A Karaoke Bar Is Helping A Japanese Town Come Back To Life After Fukushima Disaster

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Tomoko stands at the inn in Fukushima prefecture that has been in her family for generations. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Fukushima Has Turned These Grandparents Into Avid Radiation Testers

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A macaque monkey in a tree in Fukushima prefecture. After the 2011 nuclear disaster, towns and neighborhoods in Fukushima were left devoid of humans for years, and nature started to reclaim the space. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

In Rural Fukushima, 'The Border Between Monkeys And Humans Has Blurred'

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Chiyomi Endo stands beside her husband's grave. "Remember that this family evacuated Futaba town, Fukushima prefecture," the stone reads, "and moved here due to the nuclear accident following the Great East Japan Earthquake that occurred on March 11, 2011." Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

After 2011 Disaster, Fukushima Embraced Solar Power. The Rest Of Japan Has Not

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Prosecutors say TEPCO leaders should have known the risks a tsunami could pose to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, which sits along Japan's eastern coast. Here, the Unit 3 reactor is seen this past summer, amid storage tanks of radiation-contaminated water. Kimimasa Mayama/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kimimasa Mayama/AFP/Getty Images

David Gilkey is seen in 2013 at NPR's Afghanistan bureau as he started a month in the country. David wore silver bracelets on his wrist as a kind of good luck charm. He said every time he had a near-death experience, he let one go. He threw one into the Euphrates River after the second battle of Fallujah. Another went into the Helmand River after he covered the arrival of U.S. Marines in 2009. Graham Paul Smith/NPR hide caption

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Graham Paul Smith/NPR

David Gilkey Was 'An Incredibly Thoughtful' Photographer In The Midst Of Plight

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Employees work on the construction of an "ice wall" last month at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant. March 11 marked the fifth anniversary of the magnitude-9.0 earthquake and tsunami that caused meltdowns at Fukushima. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

In a photo from March 2011, then-U.S. Ambassador to Japan John Roos visits the Tohoku region, hardest hit by the tsunami and earthquake. He and his team then started the Tomodachi (Friends) Initiative to help young survivors. Ben Chang/Courtesy of John Roos hide caption

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Ben Chang/Courtesy of John Roos

After Tsunami And Quake, A U.S.-Japan Partnership To 'Give Hope'

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This San Francisco home collapsed in the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, which also claimed dozens of lives. ADAM TEITELBAUM/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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ADAM TEITELBAUM/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Quake Warning System Could Save Lives When Seconds Count

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An aerial view of Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, on March 11. Kyodo/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Kyodo/Reuters/Landov

Particles From The Edge Of Space Shine A Light On Fukushima

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Farmer Magoichi Shigihara checks on his cucumber farm in Nihonmatsu in Fukushima prefecture, about 31 miles west of the Fukushima nuclear power plant, in May 2011. Testing shows radiation in foods grown and raised in Fukushima is back to pre-accident levels. Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images

A worker walks inside the turbine hall of the Sizewell nuclear plant in eastern England in 2006. The U.K. government on Monday announced that French-owned EDF would build the first new British nuclear power station in 20 years. Lefteris Pitarakis/AP hide caption

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Lefteris Pitarakis/AP

A road leading back to the Togawas' old home in the seaside village of Namie is closed due to radioactive contamination. Geoff Brumfiel/NPR hide caption

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Geoff Brumfiel/NPR