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Demonstrators rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., in April to protest the Trump administration's plan to add a citizenship question to forms for the 2020 census. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., pauses as the House Oversight and Reform Committee votes on Wednesday to hold Attorney General William Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in contempt for failing to turn over subpoenaed documents related to the Trump administration's decision to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

ACLU's Voting Rights Project Director Dale Ho (center) speaks outside the U.S. Supreme Court in April after arguing on behalf of plaintiffs in the lawsuits over the citizenship question the Trump administration wants to add to the 2020 census. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Citizenship Question Lawsuit Plaintiffs Ask Supreme Court To Delay Ruling

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Diana Escamilla (center), an organizer with Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights in Los Angeles, poses for a photo with volunteers Angeles Rosales and Janet Mendez in front of a 2020 census outreach campaign poster in Spanish. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Protesters gather outside the U.S. Supreme Court in April as the justices hear oral arguments over the citizenship question the Trump administration wants to add to the 2020 census. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

GOP Redistricting Strategist Played Role In Push For Census Citizenship Question

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Never before has the U.S. census directly asked for the citizenship status of every person living in every household in the United States. A citizenship question that the Trump administration wants on the 2020 census could change that. Above, newly sworn-in U.S. citizens recite the Pledge of Allegiance during a naturalization ceremony at Mount Vernon in Virginia. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

A Rhode Island resident holds an envelope he received for the 2020 census test run in Providence County. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

What You Need To Know About The 2020 Census

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Worshippers exiting a mosque in the Bay Ridge neighborhood of Brooklyn, N.Y., are handed fliers encouraging participation in the 2010 census. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

For The First Time, U.S. Census To Collect Responses In Arabic Among 13 Languages

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Greetings from Texas! Data released by the U.S. Census Bureau found seven of the nation's fastest growing cities are in Texas. Found Image Holdings Inc/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Found Image Holdings Inc/Corbis via Getty Images

The U.S. government is conducting a test run of the 2020 census in Rhode Island's Providence County, where many noncitizens living in Central Falls, R.I., say they're planning to avoid participating in the national head count. RussellCreative/Getty Images hide caption

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RussellCreative/Getty Images

Many Noncitizens Plan To Avoid The 2020 Census, Test Run Indicates

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Members of the Pathfinders 5th Battalion, 101st Combat Aviation Brigade of the 101st Airborne Division, go for a run at Fort Campbell, Ky., in 2013. The Census Bureau says it will count deployed service members as residents of their home bases or ports for the 2020 census. Mark Zaleski/AP hide caption

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Mark Zaleski/AP

2020 Census To Count Deployed Troops At Home Bases, Prisoners At Facilities

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The U.S. Census Bureau says more research is needed before a separate category for people with roots in the Middle East or North Africa can be added to census forms. PeopleImages/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images/iStockphoto
Chelsea Beck/NPR

Who Put The 'Hispanic' In Hispanic Heritage Month?

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

Here's Why The Census Started Counting Latinos, And How That Could Change In 2020

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Gender-neutral signs are posted outside public restrooms at the 21c Museum Hotel in Durham, N.C. The Census Bureau says it is not planning to ask about gender identity or sexual orientation in the 2020 Census. Sara D. Davis/Getty Images hide caption

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Sara D. Davis/Getty Images

U.S. Postal Service mail carrier Thomas Russell holds a census form while working his route in 2010. Jason E. Miczek/AP hide caption

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Jason E. Miczek/AP

Run-Up To Census 2020 Raises Concerns Over Security And Politics

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Question 9 on the first page of the 2010 Census form. After more than a century, the Census Bureau is dropping use of the word "Negro" to describe black Americans in its surveys. Instead of the term, which was popularized during the Jim Crow era of racial segregation, census forms will use "black" or "African-American." Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP