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redistricting

Republican state officials in Louisiana are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to weigh in on which voters should be categorized as Black when testing whether a map of election districts dilutes the political power of Black voters. Smartboy10/Getty Images hide caption

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Who counts as Black in voting maps? Some GOP state officials want that narrowed

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Stickers reading "I voted today" sit on a table at a polling location in Summerville, S.C., during midterm primary elections on June 14. Sean Rayford/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Rayford/Getty Images

The New York state Capitol building (left) is shown next to the state appellate court building in foreground (right) on April 4 in Albany, N.Y. Hans Pennink/AP hide caption

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Hans Pennink/AP

Gary Chambers Jr., pictured in January 2021, is running for one of Louisiana's seats in the U.S. Senate. He's made headlines with his first two campaign ads. Melinda Deslatte/AP hide caption

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Melinda Deslatte/AP

Phil Strach, an attorney for Republican legislators speaks during a partisan gerrymandering trial on Jan. 5, 2022, at Campbell University School of Law in Raleigh, N.C. A divided North Carolina Supreme Court struck down the state's new maps for congressional and General Assembly seats on Friday. Travis Long/The News & Observer via AP, File hide caption

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Travis Long/The News & Observer via AP, File
Daniel Wood/NPR

Most Prisoners Can't Vote, But They're Still Counted In Voting Districts

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For months, the coronavirus pandemic and Trump officials' interference delayed the release of the 2020 census demographic data used to redraw voting districts around the United States. David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Alabama filed a federal lawsuit to force the U.S. Census Bureau to move up the release of 2020 census redistricting data and stop its plans for using a new way of keeping people's information in the data confidential. Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Long-Awaited Redistricting Data Is Expected In August After A Legal Fight Cools

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A census supporter holds up a sign during a 2020 rally in New York City. Gabriele Holtermann-Gorden/Sipa USA via Reuters hide caption

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Gabriele Holtermann-Gorden/Sipa USA via Reuters

6-Month Delay In Census Redistricting Data Could Throw Elections Into Chaos

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A voter casts a ballot on Tuesday at Jennings Senior High School in Jennings, Mo., a St. Louis suburb. Voters passed an amendment to Missouri's constitution that opens the door to redrawing state legislative districts that don't take into account children, noncitizens and other residents who are not eligible to vote. Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images

A National Fight Over Who Is Counted In Voting Districts May Arise From Missouri

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A sign encourages newly sworn-in U.S. citizens to register to vote outside a naturalization ceremony in 2019 in Los Angeles. After failing to get the now-blocked citizenship question on the 2020 census, the Trump administration is continuing to gather government records to produce citizenship data for redistricting. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Protesters against gerrymandering at a March 2019 rally coinciding with Supreme Court hearings on major redistricting cases. After the court said the federal judiciary has no role in partisan redistricting cases, legal action is focused on state courts. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

North Carolina Gerrymandering Trial Could Serve As Blueprint For Other States

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Activists at the Supreme Court opposed to partisan gerrymandering hold up representations of congressional districts from North Carolina (left) and Maryland on March 26. On June 27, justices decided that the practice is beyond the reach of federal courts. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

To Gerrymander Or Not To Gerrymander? That's The Question For Democrats

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Sara Fitzgerald and Michael Martin, both with the group One Virginia, protest gerrymandering in front of the Supreme Court in March 2018. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Redistricting Guru's Hard Drives Could Mean Legal, Political Woes For GOP

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Supporters of Missouri's redistricting ballot measure hold signs behind former state Sen. Bob Johnson during a news conference in Jefferson City, Mo., in August. David A. Lieb/AP hide caption

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David A. Lieb/AP

Rep. John Sarbanes, D-Md., speaks during a news conference to unveil House Democrats' anti-corruption bill, the For the People Act, at the U.S. Capitol on Friday. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

North Carolina will join Virginia and 17 other states that require voters to show a photo ID to vote. A sign notifies voters that a photo ID is required at the Clarke County Schools office polling location in Berryville, Va., on Nov. 6, 2018. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call,Inc./Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call,Inc./Getty Images

Texas Attorney General candidate Justin Nelson leads a pub crawl across three congressional districts in downtown Austin - the Pub Crawl to End Gerrymandering. Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT hide caption

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Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT

Former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger speaks at a rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court in October on the day arguments took place in a case about political maps in Wisconsin. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

A man with a set of maps heads to a federal courthouse in San Antonio last year for a redistricting trial. Texas is one of three states with cases in redistricting before the Supreme Court. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP