redistricting redistricting

Former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger speaks at a rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court in October on the day arguments took place in a case about political maps in Wisconsin. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

A man with a set of maps heads to a federal courthouse in San Antonio last year for a redistricting trial. Texas is one of three states with cases in redistricting before the Supreme Court. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

North Carolina Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger says Democrats are looking to deflect blame for their electoral losses. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP
Alyson Hurt/NPR

Redistricting Reform Advocates Say The Real 'Rigged System' Is Gerrymandering

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A federal panel ruled Friday that three of Texas's Congressional districts, including the 35th, shown here, were illegally drawn by the state's Republicans. Screengrab by NPR/Google Maps hide caption

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Screengrab by NPR/Google Maps

Understanding Congressional Gerrymandering: 'It's Moneyball Applied To Politics'

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The Supreme Court of the United states ruled Monday that the total population as defined by the Census Bureau should be used when counting people for political purposes. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

The gurney in the the execution chamber at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester, Okla. On Monday the Supreme Court voted 5-4 in a case from Oklahoma that the sedative midazolam can be used in executions without violating the prohibition on cruel and unusual punishment. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Supreme Court Concludes Term With Death Penalty Ruling, Looks Ahead

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As a staff member takes down the Arizona redistricting map, Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission chair Colleen Mathis gets a hug from Frank Bergen, a Pima County Democrat, at a 2012 meeting. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP