Oklahoma Oklahoma

In November, voters in Oklahoma approved criminal justice reforms such as making possession of drugs a misdemeanor and redirecting state money to treatment programs. Now there are several bills to repeal the reforms. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Oklahoma Lawmakers File Bills To Repeal Criminal Justice Reforms

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Gas prices seen at an Oklahoma City 7-Eleven in December. Amid a state budget slump, Oklahoma lawmakers are considering raising gas taxes for the first time in 30 years. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Gas Taxes May Go Up Around The Country As States Seek To Plug Budget Holes

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Herman "Dub" Tolbert, shown inside an American Legion post in Bokoshe, Okla., says the community is left exposed and he's determined to make regulators listen. Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma

Communities Uneasy As Utilities Look For Places To Store Coal Ash

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Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin walks on the floor of the Oklahoma House on Wednesday. On Friday, Fallin vetoed legislation that would make it a felony for doctors to perform an abortion. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Robert Bates arrives for his arraignment at the Tulsa County Courthouse in Tulsa, Okla., on April 21, 2015. Bates has been convicted of second-degree manslaughter. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

After a magnitude-4.5 earthquake was recorded near Cushing in October, Oklahoma regulators ordered oil companies to shut down several disposal wells. That seemed to slow the shaking — at least for a while. Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma

Confidence In Oil Hub Security Shaken By Oklahoma Earthquakes

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Gary Matli, a field supervisor with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, inspects a disposal well located east of Guthrie, Okla. Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma

Faced With Spate Of Tremors, Oklahoma Looks To Shake Up Its Oil Regulations

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A truckload of seed wheat and rye awaits planting near Orlando, Okla., back in 2012, when the price per bushel of wheat was 50 percent higher than it is now. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Low Wheat Prices Leave A Gluten Glut At Midwest's Grain Elevators

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