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A serving of salmon contains about 600 IUs of vitamin D, researchers say, and a cup of fortified milk around 100. Cereals and juices are sometimes fortified, too. Check the labels, researchers say, and aim for 600 IUs daily, or 800 if you're older than 70. Dorling Kindersley/Getty Images/Dorling Kindersley hide caption

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Dorling Kindersley/Getty Images/Dorling Kindersley

Does Vitamin D Really Protect Against Colorectal Cancer?

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The National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine recommends that most adults get about 600 international units of vitamin D per day through food or supplements, increasing that dose to 800 IUs per day for those 70 or older. essgee51/Flickr hide caption

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A Bit More Vitamin D Might Help Prevent Colds And Flu

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Yana Shapiro relaxes while taking an intravenous vitamin treatment at RestoreIV in Philadelphia. Emma Lee/WHYY hide caption

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Emma Lee/WHYY

Skeptics Question The Value Of Hydration Therapy For The Healthy

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In addition to heart problems triggered by some supplements, emergencies often arise when kids swallow dietary supplements meant for adults, according to the CDC analysis, or when older adults choke on the pills. Lee Woodgate/Ikon Images/Corbis hide caption

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Lee Woodgate/Ikon Images/Corbis

Dietary Supplements Send Thousands To ERs Yearly

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Ideally, we'd all eat super healthful diets. But that's not the world we live in, and multivitamins may help bridge the nutritional gaps. Jasper White/Getty Images hide caption

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Jasper White/Getty Images

Multivitamins: The Case For Taking One A Day

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