federal taxes federal taxes

House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., announces the outlines of a GOP overhaul of the tax code in September. The full bill's release is being delayed to Thursday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

House Speaker Paul Ryan answers reporters' questions moments after the House narrowly passed a budget, 216 to 212, beginning a process for the Senate to move forward on an overhaul of the tax code. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Analysts at the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center predict that nearly three-quarters of the savings from the GOP tax overhaul would go to the top 20 percent of earners. Roy Scott/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Roy Scott/Getty Images

President Donald Trump, flanked by Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., (left) and Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., speaks during a meeting with senators on his Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch, on Feb. 9, 2017, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Evan Vucci/AP

A statue of former Treasury Secretary Albert Gallatin stands guard outside the Treasury Building in Washington. Trump's campaign plans for a total overhaul of the U.S. tax code — while maintaining the revenues flowing into the federal government — may have missed their chance in Congress. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Some Tax-Cut Backers Urge Trump To Drop Full Overhaul, Go For Quick Win

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/524797139/524833764" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Donald Trump leaves an elevator at Trump Tower in New York City, just prior to delivering a speech in September that outlined his plan for tax reform. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Who Benefits From Donald Trump's Tax Plan?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/501739277/501904272" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An image of President-elect Donald Trump appears Wednesday on a television screen on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Business leaders are taking a wait-and-see approach to his administration. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Richard Drew/AP

In Economy As In Business, Trumponomics May Mean Building Big Things

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/501476997/501477004" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Linda (left) and Colleen Squires have been together for 30 years and married for 12. This year will be the first time they can file both their state and federal taxes as any other married couple. Courtesy of Colleen Squires hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Colleen Squires

For Same-Sex Married Couples In America, A Historic Tax Day

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474074479/474185187" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The price of getting a health insurance card may seem expensive, but officials say the minimum tax penalty for remaining uninsured is $695, and could rise to more than $10,000 for wealthy families who choose not to get coverage. Photo Alto/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Photo Alto/Getty Images

House Speaker John Boehner listens as President Obama speaks to media during a bipartisan, bicameral leadership meeting at the White House this week. Boehner and others have reacted dismissively to Obama's tax overhaul plan. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Carolyn Kaster/AP

While many people look to tax preparation services for help, Tobie Stanger, editor at Consumer Reports, says online tools are often cost-effective. /iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption
/iStockphoto.com

'Consumer Reports' Offers Tips For Doing Taxes Online

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/173246283/173399254" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Left to right: Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) at a news conference on Capitol Hill today.

Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images