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David Torrence, seen here during the 2014 Penn Relays at Franklin Field in Philadelphia, has died in Scottsdale, Ariz. Icon Sports Wire/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Icon Sports Wire/Corbis via Getty Images

An African cheetah (acinonyx jubatus lanea) at Inverdoorn Game Reservein South Africa. Thierry Falise/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Thierry Falise/LightRocket via Getty Images

New Research Suggests Why Mid-Sized Animals Are The Fastest

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Researchers had participants wear the fitness trackers while walking or running on a treadmill and while riding an exercise bike to determine how well the trackers measured heart rate and energy expenditure. Paul Sakuma/Courtesy of Stanford University School of Medicine hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/Courtesy of Stanford University School of Medicine

Fitness Trackers: Good at Measuring Heart Rate, Not So Good At Measuring Calories

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Runners assemble at the starting line of the third annual Qingyuan marathon. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

In Fast-Paced China, Marathon Craze Is Off And Running (Despite A Clumsy Start)

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The laces on the left are tied in a strong knot that lies horizontally. The laces on the right are tied in a knot that makes the bow lie vertically and which, according to new research, can come untied more easily. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Untangling The Mystery Of Why Shoelaces Come Untied

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Dr. Tonatiuh Barrientos Gutierrez, an epidemiologist in Mexico City, jogs near his home in the southern part of the capital. He says it's hard to run on the city's streets. Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR hide caption

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Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR

In Diabetes Fight, Lifestyle Changes Prove Hard To Come By In Mexico

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Interval training includes bursts of high-intensity efforts sandwiched by periods of less activity. Jonathan Cohen/Flickr hide caption

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Jonathan Cohen/Flickr

Does 1-Minute Interval Training Work? We Ask The Guy Who Tested It

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Jolly old Santa himself. Unpictured: the sweat, pain and — possibly? — tears that went into tracing his form on the map. Owen Delaney/Courtesy of Strava hide caption

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Owen Delaney/Courtesy of Strava

Researchers have long known that exercise is good for the brain. An enzyme produced by muscles might help explain why. Monalyn Gracia/Corbis/VCG/Getty Images hide caption

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Monalyn Gracia/Corbis/VCG/Getty Images

A Protein That Moves From Muscle To Brain May Tie Exercise To Memory

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The researchers were inspired by working with ultramarathoners, who can be sidelined by blisters despite years of training. These runners competed in the 2007 Badwater Ultramarathon in Death Valley, Calif. Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

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Chris Carlson/AP

Izaic Yorks, a senior at the University of Washington, recently ran a mile in 3:53 — the fastest mile of any American collegiate athlete. Here, he competes on Feb. 27 in Seattle. Stephen Brashear/Red Box Pictures hide caption

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Stephen Brashear/Red Box Pictures

Why Fastest U.S. College Mile Runner Won't Be Vying To Be NCAA Champ

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