Homeland Security Homeland Security
Stories About

Homeland Security

Immigration and Customs Enforcement raided a cellphone repair company in Texas on Wednesday. Buses left the site a few hours after the raid began, presumably with some of the 280 workers accused of being in the country without proper documentation. Anthony Cave/KERA hide caption

toggle caption
Anthony Cave/KERA

Former secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano prepares to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee in 2013. She has written a new book called How Safe Are We? Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Former Homeland Security Head Napolitano Says Cybersecurity Should Be A Top Priority

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/708209142/708599964" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In late January, Carlos Catarldo Gomez of Honduras was the first person returned to Mexico to wait for his asylum trial date. The Trump administration announced on Tuesday that this program, dubbed 'Migrant Protection Protocols,' will expand from San Diego to Calexico, Calif. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gregory Bull/AP

A U.S. Border Patrol agent takes an immigrant into custody in December 2018. Numerous members of the migrant caravan crossed over from Tijuana to San Diego but were quickly taken into custody by U.S. Border Patrol agents. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

The "University of Farmington" occupied office space in this building in Farmington Hills, Mich. In court documents, eight men are accused of recruiting hundreds of "students" to the bogus school. Google Maps/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Google Maps/Screenshot by NPR

Central American migrants, part of a caravan trying to reach the U.S., cross from Guatemala into a Mexican border and customs facility in Ciudad Hidalgo, Chiapas, on Wednesday. Edgard Garrido/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Edgard Garrido/Reuters

Ballots in New York City ahead of the 2016 general elections. While U.S. election officials have made progress increasing security, gaps still remain. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Week Of Trump Reversals Puts 2018 Election Security In The Spotlight

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/630588925/630742975" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, the face of the Trump administration's policy that has split up migrant families, was heckled inside a Mexican restaurant. She's seen here at Monday's daily briefing at the White House. Leah Millis/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Leah Millis/Reuters

The National Security Administration campus in Fort Meade, Md., where the U.S. Cyber Command is located. Acting Homeland Security Adviser Rob Joyce said Monday he would leave the White House to return to the NSA. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick Semansky/AP

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York is being blamed by President Trump for promoting a visa program that was used by the alleged driver of the truck in the New York terrorist attack. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

James Mathew Bradley Jr., 60, (center) is escorted out of the federal court house following a hearing Monday in San Antonio. Bradley was arrested in connection with the deaths of 10 people packed into a broiling tractor-trailer. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Gay/AP

"It's hard to walk away from gas chambers and ovens without a sober feeling of commitment ... to make damn sure that the United States of America is protected from the evils of the world," Rep. Clay Higgins said in the video filmed at Auschwitz. NOLA.com/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
NOLA.com/Screenshot by NPR

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly, pictured in April, is extending the Temporary Protected Status designation for Haitians in the U.S. until January 2018. But he says conditions are improving in Haiti, seven years after an earthquake killed more than 200,000 people there. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Homeland Security Extends Protections For Thousands Of Haitians In U.S.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/529550684/529634915" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Donald J. Trump (C) delivers his first address to a joint session of the U.S. Congress as U.S. Vice President Mike Pence (L) and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (R) listen on February 28, 2017, in the House chamber of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. Jim Lo Scalzo - Pool/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Lo Scalzo - Pool/Getty Images

A view from the International bridge between Presidio, Texas, and Ojinaga, Mexico, shows the flooded checkpoint between the two cities on Sept. 17, 2008. A levee broke and water from the Rio Grande inundated parts of the city with 10 feet of water. Walt Frerck/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Walt Frerck/AP

Mexico Worries That A New Border Wall Will Worsen Flooding

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/525383494/525516809" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript