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A youth in Tijuana, Mexico, stands by the border fence that separates Mexico from the United States, where candles and crosses stand in memory of migrants who have died during their journey toward the U.S. Emilio Espejel/AP hide caption

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Emilio Espejel/AP

Trump Administration Hits Some Immigrants In U.S. Illegally With Fines Up To $500,000

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A DJI Technology drone flies during a demonstration in Shenzhen, China, in 2014. DJI sells the majority of Chinese-made drones bought in the United States. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

'We're Not Being Paranoid': U.S. Warns Of Spy Dangers Of Chinese-Made Drones

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Kirstjen Nielsen, then Homeland Security Secretary, testified on Capitol Hill before the House Homeland Security Committee in March. She said "cases of fake families are cropping up everywhere," among the surge of migrants at the Southern border. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Immigration and Customs Enforcement raided a cellphone repair company in Texas on Wednesday. Buses left the site a few hours after the raid began, presumably with some of the 280 workers accused of being in the country without proper documentation. Anthony Cave/KERA hide caption

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Anthony Cave/KERA

Former secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano prepares to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee in 2013. She has written a new book called How Safe Are We? Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Former Homeland Security Head Napolitano Says Cybersecurity Should Be A Top Priority

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In late January, Carlos Catarldo Gomez of Honduras was the first person returned to Mexico to wait for his asylum trial date. The Trump administration announced on Tuesday that this program, dubbed 'Migrant Protection Protocols,' will expand from San Diego to Calexico, Calif. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

A U.S. Border Patrol agent takes an immigrant into custody in December 2018. Numerous members of the migrant caravan crossed over from Tijuana to San Diego but were quickly taken into custody by U.S. Border Patrol agents. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

The "University of Farmington" occupied office space in this building in Farmington Hills, Mich. In court documents, eight men are accused of recruiting hundreds of "students" to the bogus school. Google Maps/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Google Maps/Screenshot by NPR

Central American migrants, part of a caravan trying to reach the U.S., cross from Guatemala into a Mexican border and customs facility in Ciudad Hidalgo, Chiapas, on Wednesday. Edgard Garrido/Reuters hide caption

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Edgard Garrido/Reuters

Ballots in New York City ahead of the 2016 general elections. While U.S. election officials have made progress increasing security, gaps still remain. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Week Of Trump Reversals Puts 2018 Election Security In The Spotlight

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Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, the face of the Trump administration's policy that has split up migrant families, was heckled inside a Mexican restaurant. She's seen here at Monday's daily briefing at the White House. Leah Millis/Reuters hide caption

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Leah Millis/Reuters

The National Security Administration campus in Fort Meade, Md., where the U.S. Cyber Command is located. Acting Homeland Security Adviser Rob Joyce said Monday he would leave the White House to return to the NSA. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York is being blamed by President Trump for promoting a visa program that was used by the alleged driver of the truck in the New York terrorist attack. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images