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Francescangeli says boys sometimes work long hours and are often tasked with pushing carts to move rocks out of the mines. "Being a child in these places is really hard," he says. "If they have some time to spend in a free way, they like to be children. But their life doesn't permit them to be children so often." Simone Francescangeli hide caption

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Simone Francescangeli

Brazilian 76-year-old farmer Jose Pascual walks through a devastated area in Paracatu de Baixo village on October 2016, one year after a mine waste flood destroyed the town. The village was ruined in 2015 by a flood following the collapse of Brazilian mining company Samarco's waste reservoir, killing 19 people. YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump and his supporters claim that in exchange for millions of dollars in donations to the Clinton Foundation, Hillary Clinton supported the 2010 sale of a mining company that gave Russia control of U.S. uranium supplies. Craig Ruttle/AP hide caption

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Craig Ruttle/AP

President Donald Trump signs a bill repealing a rule passed last July that required oil, gas and mining companies to disclose payments to overseas governments. The rule was meant to promote transparency. Critics of the repeal argue it served as an important national security tool since corruption often leads to violence, instability and terrorism. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Repeal Of Anti-Corruption Rule May Hurt National Security, Critics Warn

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A coal mining brigade unloads a cart full of coal that has been freshly mined from half-a-mile below the surface of the earth. For some rural Mongolians, risking their lives in crude, makeshift mines is the only way to survive. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

Amid Economic Crisis, Mongolians Risk Their Lives For Do-It-Yourself Mining

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Water flows through a series of sediment retention ponds in August 2015 that were built to contain heavy metal and chemical contaminants from the Gold King Mine wastewater accident in Colorado. That site, and 47 others in southwest Colorado, were declared Superfund sites on Wednesday. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

Smoke wafts over the highway linking the Bolivian capital of La Paz with the Chilean border during an ongoing clash between striking miners, who are blockading the road, and police. Aizar Raldes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Aizar Raldes/AFP/Getty Images

Former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship was sentenced to the maximum of one year in prison for conspiring to break safety laws and defrauding mine regulators at West Virginia's Upper Big Branch Mine, which exploded in 2010, killing 29 men. Tyler Evert /AP hide caption

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Tyler Evert /AP

A worker in Claysville, Pa., shovels the fine powder that's part of a watery mixture used in hydraulic fracturing. Silica dust is created in a wide variety of construction and manufacturing industries, too. Keith Srakocic/AP hide caption

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Keith Srakocic/AP

Tighter, Controversial Silica Rules Aimed At Saving Workers' Lungs

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A coal miner stands in the Dotiki mine, operated by Alliance Coal, in Webster County, Ky. Steve Inskeep/NPR hide caption

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Steve Inskeep/NPR

In Kentucky, The Coal Habit Is Hard To Break

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Contaminated wastewater is seen at the entrance to the Gold King Mine in San Juan County, Colo., in this picture released by the Environmental Protection Agency. The photo was taken Wednesday; the plume of contaminated water has continued to work its way downstream. Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Reuters /Landov

Women and their children wait for medication and instructions on how to use it at the clinic in Dareta, Nigeria. Treating children with high levels of lead is a painstaking process that works only if their environment at home is free from lead. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Fallout From Financial Crisis: Thousands Of Nigerian Kids Poisoned By Lead

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Women and their children wait for medication and instructions on how to use it at the clinic in Dareta, Nigeria. Treating children with high levels of lead is a painstaking process that works only if their environment at home is free from lead. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Brandi and Kaylee plan to open a truck repair shop when they graduate from high school. Robert Smith/NPR hide caption

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Robert Smith/NPR

Boom Town, U.S.A.

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