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first responders

First responders transfer patients from ambulances to Broward Health Medical Center in Ft. Lauderdale on the afternoon of Feb. 14. The hospital was on lockdown after receiving victims of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Jessica Bakeman /WLRN hide caption

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Jessica Bakeman /WLRN

Hospital Lockdowns Can Leave Patients' Loved Ones Locked Out

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Some firefighters, paramedics and police officers say the tragedies they respond to haunt them, leading to depression, job burnout, substance abuse, and more. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

First responders in the Marina District disaster zone after an earthquake on October 17, 1989 in San Francisco, Calif. Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images hide caption

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Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images

Betting On Artificial Intelligence To Guide Earthquake Response

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Firefighters work beneath the vertical struts of the World Trade Center's twin towers, in Lower Manhattan, following the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Mark Lennihan/Associated Press hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/Associated Press

Sept. 11 First Responder Fights On Behalf Of Others Who Rushed To Help

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Bob Topmiller, chief of toxicology at the Hamilton County Coroner's Office, holds a small vial containing carfentanil extracted from a sample of blood. Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media

Deadly Opioid Overwhelms First Responders And Crime Labs in Ohio

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Fernando Boiteux tosses Emily, a remote-controlled lifesaving device, into the waters off the shore of the Greek island of Lesbos. Boiteux, an assistant fire chief from Los Angeles, is helping train Greek first responders to use Emily. Joanna Kakissis for NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis for NPR

How A High-Tech Buoy Named Emily Could Save Migrants Off Greece

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Since it was built by the Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service in 1998, 90,000 emergency responders have come to "Disaster City" to climb over mangled steel and through derailed chemical trains. Lauren Silverman /KERA hide caption

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Lauren Silverman /KERA

In 'Disaster City,' Learning To Use Robots To Face Ebola

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