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domestic terrorism

Michael McGarrity, FBI Assistant Director of the Counterterrorism Division; Calvin Shivers, FBI Deputy Assistant Director in the Criminal Investigative Division; and Elizabeth Neumann, an assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security, answer lawmakers' questions on Tuesday about the Trump administration's response to far-right extremism. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Federal prosecutors say Christopher Paul Hasson had acquired a cache of weapons and ammunition in an attempt to launch a domestic terrorist attack. Over the years, Hasson honed a hit list that included prominent Democrats and media figures. U.S. District Court via AP hide caption

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U.S. District Court via AP

Members of a haz-mat team help remove a hazardous materials suit from an investigator (in white) who emerged from the U.S. Post Office in West Trenton, N.J., on Oct. 25, 2001. Samples from the facility were part of an investigation into letters containing anthrax. Tom Mihalek/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Mihalek/AFP/Getty Images

A small group prays at a makeshift memorial for victims of the Las Vegas massacre. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Why Finding A Motive After The Las Vegas Shooting Matters

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Crime scene tape surrounds the Mandalay Hotel in Las Vegas after a gunman in one of its rooms killed at least 58 people, with more than 500 others injured, when he opened fire on a country music concert late Sunday. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

What Is, And Isn't, Considered Domestic Terrorism

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Sometimes it can feel like there is a terrorist attack on the news every other week. But how much attention an attack receives has a lot to do with one factor: the religion of the perpetrator. David McNew /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew /AFP/Getty Images

When Is It 'Terrorism'? How The Media Cover Attacks By Muslim Perpetrators

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Attorney Jessica Hedges (center) talks to members of the media outside the federal courthouse in Boston after the arraignment of her client David Wright on Wednesday. Stephan Savoia/AP hide caption

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Stephan Savoia/AP

FBI Director James B. Comey takes a question during a news conference in March. Comey says the FBI issued a bulletin to local law enforcement about one of the Garland, Texas, assailants three hours before the attack. Joshua Roberts/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Joshua Roberts/Reuters/Landov

Spectators bow their heads during a moment of silence during a ceremony to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing at the Oklahoma City National Memorial, on Sunday. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

A duplex where a 19-year-old man was found dead is shown in Timberlea, Nova Scotia, on Friday. Royal Canadian Mounted Police say they foiled a plot to commit a mass shooting. Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Reuters/Landov

A memorial at the site of the first explosion in the Boston Marathon bombing. Defense attorneys say too many people in the potential jury pool have some kind of personal connection to the case. Andrew Burton /Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Burton /Getty Images

Accused Bomber's Lawyers Say Boston Jury Pool Is Too Biased

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Belgian paratroopers guard outside a Jewish school in the central city of Antwerp on Saturday, a day after authorities made several arrests of alleged Islamist extremists who they say were plotting attacks. Yves Herman/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Yves Herman/Reuters/Landov