Internet security Internet security

Apple's Philip Schiller unveiled the Face ID feature in September. Less than a week after the iPhone X was released, a Vietnamese security firm said it had cracked Face ID using a specially made mask. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Security Firm Says Extremely Creepy Mask Cracks iPhone X's Face ID

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The National Institute of Standards and Technology recently revised its guidelines on creating passwords. eclipse_images/iStockPhoto hide caption

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Forget Tough Passwords: New Guidelines Make It Simple

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The Nest thermostat is an Internet-connected device. Security technologist Bruce Schneier says that while Internet-enabled devices have immense promise, they are vulnerable to hacking. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Getty Images

Despite Its Promise, The Internet Of Things Remains Vulnerable

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Journalist Andrew McGill wanted to see if it was possible to hack a virtual toaster, after major servers were downed by connected appliances. He said it took less than an hour for hackers to find it. ProSymbols/The Noun Project/Andrew McGill/Courtesy of The Atlantic hide caption

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ProSymbols/The Noun Project/Andrew McGill/Courtesy of The Atlantic

An Experiment Shows How Quickly The Internet Of Things Can Be Hacked

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1.2 Billion Web Credentials Said To Be In Russian Gang's Hands

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Those who search for drug information online may be "drowned out in a sea of rogue results." iStockphoto.com hide caption

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